Important Milestones of a Trial in EU Countries

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This paper is a joint publication of the members of the IT IT LAW Group Europe, a tight network of legal professionals in the areas of IT law and intellectual property rights (IP).

1         European Union

1.1         LEGAL FRAMEWORK

The judicial process is one of those matters which has been only harmonised a little within the European Union. Each country is relatively free to set the rules for procedures conducted before its national courts. However, states must act in accordance with the general principles, issuing, in particular, from the European Convention on Human Rights.

1.2         MAIN PRINCIPLES

However, there are trends that can be observed:

  1. In civil and commercial matters, each party must notify the other, in principle at the beginning of the proceedings, regarding the pieces of evidence on which the legal action is based. The risk of a last minute surprise or of a hidden item, discovered during the hearing, is relatively low.
  2. Most proceedings require the preparation of a written position. Even when the law allows itself to be limited to oral considerations, it is recommended at most times to file, in addition, written evidence.
  3. In most countries, judges do not like pieces of evidence written in a foreign language. If there are correspondence or contracts to be produced in court, they must be translated into the language of the proceedings. Otherwise, one risks seeing the piece of evidence altogether excluded from the proceedings in court. On the other hand, most of the time, a simple translation is admitted (it is not necessary to use a sworn translator).
  4. There is a significant difference between substantive proceedings and injunction proceedings. Substantive proceedings are basically intended to definitively decide the dispute (subject to a party making an appeal). In injunction proceedings, the judge does not decide the dispute but has the power, under certain conditions, to order a provisional situation. Injunction proceedings are increasingly common, especially in cases related to IP and innovation.
  5. In some matters (often intellectual property), there may be special proceedings that seek to resolve the dispute definitively, but give rise to judgment as rapidly as injunction proceedings. This is one of the first things to check, because if this is the case, there is no time to lose!
  6. The adversarial principle is the basic guideline; unilateral (or ex parte) measures are the exception. Unilateral measures are those taken at the request of a party, without the judge hearing the other party. They are generally reserved for cases in which the judge recognises that the element of surprise or urgency is necessary. Sometimes, it is extreme urgency that justifies the assumption but it is relatively rare (it must be demonstrated that the urgency is such that it is necessary to derogate from the fundamental principle of adversarial proceedings in court).
  7. There is a very important dispute concerning the question of whether the judge is territorially competent. Indeed, the EU is a fairly small area with plenty of intra-Community trade, and it happens very often that a dispute involves several countries. This is even more true when the internet comes into play. The first thing to do is to identify the country in which the proceedings will be introduced (in defence, one will check also the means of challenging the jurisdiction of the court, if necessary). The issue is regulated by European legislation, but that legislation is very complex.
  8. Once a judgment is rendered in a civil or commercial matter, its execution within the European Union is greatly facilitated by the adoption of a number of texts that provide for virtually automatic recognition of decisions in the European Union.

2         AUSTRIA

2.1         LEGAL FRAMEWORK

The quality and speed of justice provided by the Austrian courts – especially those competent for Intellectual Property (IP) – is very high indeed. Austria provides an excellent venue for IP litigation by providing fast, efficient and reliable courts with comparatively low litigation costs. Also it is not without good reason that Austrian courts are the ones referring – especially in relation to the size of Austria – the most IP-, Information Technology (IT)- and unfair competition matters to the ECJ for guidance[1].  Especially due to the fast proceedings on preliminary injunctions up to the Austrian Supreme Court, the Supreme Court has in many cases issued the first world wide decisions by a supreme court related to “new” issues in the field of IP and IT, eg non-registered community designs[2],  domain names[3],  keyword advertising[4],  etc. So in general, Austrian courts perform well in handling IP (infringement) cases. This also applies with regard to the duration of proceedings: Interlocutory proceedings are carried out very quickly, usually within a few weeks and in exceptional cases within a few days. Proceedings on the merits will add one to two years in the 1st instance. It is worth mentioning that the average duration of civil proceedings before the Austrian Supreme Court in 2012 was only 98 days[5].

Like in most European countries many areas of Austrian substantive and procedural law have been harmonized through various EC Directives, also or even especially in the field of IP and related matters. In general, the Austrian legislator is – especially in the field of IP-laws – implementing the EU law with high accuracy. In this context it is worth mentioning that the organization of the courts and most areas of civil procedure are still fully subject to national legislation – in Austria falling into the competence of the Federal State (Bundesstaat) and not into the competence of each State of the Federal State (Bundesländer).

2.2         MAIN PRINCIPLES

First of all it is worth mentioning that the Austria procedural laws have tight rules relating to jurisdiction and therefore eg the issue of forum shopping does not pose major problems in Austria. Exclusive jurisdiction in IP (infringement) matters lies solely with the Commercial Court Vienna (Handelsgericht Wien) in 1st instance, in 2nd instance with the Higher Regional Court of Vienna (Oberlandesgericht Wien) and in 3rd and last instance with the Austrian Supreme Court (ObersterGerichtshof). The conduct of criminal IP matters is under the exclusive jurisdiction of the Vienna Regional Court for Criminal Matters (LandesgerichtfürStrafsachen Wien) in 1st instance and then with the above courts in 2nd and 3rd instance. In IT matters no special competence is stipulated by law, so generally the court of the defendant is competent.

The language in IP-proceedings is exclusively German[6].  Generally, all documents filed have to be in German or at least translated into the German language. [7] In case of parties, witnesses etc not being able to give their statements in German, the court generally makes use of certified translators. There is no choice of language.

According to the rules of the Austrian Civil Procedure Code (“ZPO”), which are applicable (also) in IP (infringement) proceedings before court, all parties have to be represented by an attorney at law authorised to practice in Austria. It is worth mentioning that Austrian attorneys at law can represent their clients all over Austria and also in all instances.

All IP rights in Austria grant exclusive rights. In the context of those exclusive rights in general the following claims are admissible:

  1. In case of an infringement irrespective of any fault civil claims regarding cease and desist (permanent injunction), removal (if not interfering with third party rights), publication of the judgment, appropriate compensation, rendering of accounts, receiving information on provenance/channel of distribution of the goods;
  2. In case of infringement with fault: damages and surrender of profits;
  3. Irrespective of default in case of an infringement temporary / preliminary injunctions – also in respect of threatened infringement of IP rights; it is worth mentioning that such injunctions may have the effect of a recall-order as the obliged party has to stop the infringement with immediate effect to the best of his / her possibilities, meaning the take products of the market that are infringing and are under (legal) control of the infringer;
  4. Action for a declaration of non-infringement;
  5. Action for a declaration of invalidity of (registered) IP rights;
  6. In case of intentional IP right infringements the initiation of private criminal actions;
  7. Applications for customs action pursuant to the Austrian law on counterfeiting (border measures).

2.3         IMPORTANT MILESTONES OF THE TRIAL

  1. Although it is – except in copyright matters regarding intermediaries (eg Internet providers) – not mandatory under Austrian law, enforcement cases are commonly initiated by a letter before action requesting what is provided to the right holder by law[8]. Giving notice of the potential claim before the issuance of proceedings is recommended also with regard to the award of costs, especially if the defendant admits liability and does not dispute the claim (Sec 45 ZPO).
  2. Civil (IP) proceedings in the merits are initiated by a brief of action lodged by the plaintiff. Such brief is served upon the defendant by the court per recommended mail, who – within a period of four weeks – is ordered to file a reply with the court.

Before, at the same time with or even after the action the plaintiff can also file for a preliminary / interlocutory injunction for cease and desist and also for seizure of the infringing goods and collecting of evidence (“civil house search”). The defendant has to disagree to such application for an injunction as otherwise the injunction is granted. Generally the courts grant to the defendant a time period of eight days to file a brief to disagree. Generally after hearing the parties the court issues a decision on the application for a preliminary / interlocutory injunction, generally within some weeks.

  1. In the main proceeding an oral hearing is set by the judge if the defendant has filed a reply to the action in due time. Generally such hearing takes place after some weeks after the reply was filed. The first hearing is generally used to try to settle the matter. If this is not possible the judge can immediately start the taking of evidence but generally the judge sets a new date. The hearings are extended until the judge is of the opinion that all necessary evidence has been taken – then the proceeding is closed without further statements of the parties etc.
  2. Generally judgments have to be issued within four weeks after the closure of the proceeding. However, in practice the time period is generally longer.

Calendar:

  • Action (application for preliminary injunction) filed with the Commercial Court of Vienna by Claimant;
  • Action (application) is served to the Defendant by the court;
  • Defendant has to file reply within four weeks (has to disagree with the application of a preliminary injunction generally within eight days);
  • Court sets a date for an oral hearing;
  • Parties can file a “preparatory brief” until one week before the hearing;
  • First hearing is generally used to try to settle the matter and to speak about the further “program” of the proceeding, meaning, if court experts are needed etc;
  • Hearings take place until the judge is of the opinion that all necessary evidence has been taken;
  • Judge closes the proceeding and can issue an oral decision (in practice very uncommon) or can declare that the judgment will be made in writing;
  • Judgment has to be issued by the judge within four weeks; generally it takes longer.

2.4         FIRST INSTANCE PROCEDURE

IP litigation in Austria is characterised by a centralised court which handles civil IP disputes (both interlocutory and main proceedings), namely the Commercial Court of Vienna (Handelsgericht Wien): Patent (infringement) matters are handled by a senate of three judges, one of them being a “technical lay judge”, namely a patent attorney. Generally all other IP matters are handled by a single judge. Criminal litigation is handled exclusively by the Vienna Regional Court for Criminal Matters (LandesgerichtfürStrafsachen Wien).

Civil (IP) proceedings are initiated by a brief of action lodged by the plaintiff. Such brief is served upon the defendant, who – within a period of four weeks – is ordered to file a reply with the court. If no reply is filed by the defendant the plaintiff can request a default judgment. If a reply is filed, the judge sets a date for a first hearing. The parties can file another brief until one week before this hearing; further briefs can only be filed if ordered or if accepted in advance by the court.

Pursuant to the Austrian Civil Procedural Act in the first hearing the judge shall discuss the possibility of a settlement. However, if the parties declare that a settlement is not possible the judge can

immediately take evidence by reviewing filed or presented documents, including private experts’ opinions, and other evidence, by interrogating the parties and the witnesses. It is worth mentioning that the Austrian procedural law does not provide for a formalistic cross-interrogation, but the parties respectively their attorneys at law have the right to ask questions, generally after the judge has asked his / her questions. If considered necessary by the judge, court experts can be appointed by the court.

In the main proceedings plaintiff is held to prove high probability (not just on a balance of probability basis) of the infringement. In other words: The court has to be convinced that with a “legal certainty” the infringement took place. Upon completion of the process of taking evidence the judge closes the proceedings and should render a judgment in writing within four weeks – in practice it takes longer.

2.5         JUDGMENTS AND FURTHER APPEALS

Within four weeks after the judgment was served to the parties by the Commercial Court of Vienna, the decision can be appealed before the Higher Regional Court of Vienna (Oberlandesgericht Wien). The appeal postpones any effect of the judgment. The other party can file a reply to the appeal within four weeks after the service of the appeal by the court.

In preliminary proceedings the decision on the application of a preliminary injunction can be appealed before the Higher Regional Court of Vienna within two weeks. A granted preliminary injunction is generally not affected by such appeal. The other party can file a reply to the appeal within two weeks after the service of the appeal by the court.

Whereas the first instance considers both the facts and the law completely, the Higher Regional Court of Vienna, in generally, only considers whether the first instance has evaluated the facts and the law correctly. Accordingly, new facts can generally not be submitted in the appeal proceeding.

The Higher Regional Court of Vienna always decides in a senate of three judges. In patent matter the senate includes a “technical lay judge”, namely a patent attorney.

2.6         REVISION (SUPREME COURT)

Only if important questions of law are present can an appeal can be filed against the decision of the Higher Regional Court of Vienna to the Austrian Supreme Court. In any case the appeal has to be filed within four weeks after the decision was served. Generally, the other party can file a reply to the appeal within four weeks after the service of the appeal by the court.

In preliminary proceedings the decision of the second instance can generally in all IP matters be appeal before the Austrian Supreme Court within two weeks after the decision was served. Generally, the other party can file a reply to the appeal within two weeks after the service of the appeal by the court.

The Austrian Supreme Court decides in senates. In patent matters the senate can decide to include a “technical lay judge”, namely a patent attorney.

In practice, only a small percentage of the cases reach the Austrian Supreme Court, but in IP matters the percentage seems to be much higher than in other fields of law.

2.7         THE PRELIMINARY RULING QUESTION BEFORE THE EUROPEAN COURT OF JUSTICE

As mentioned above the Austrian judges are not at all hesitant to ask preliminary ruling questions to the European Court of Justice (ECJ). The highest instance is even obliged to ask the ECJ if questions of European law remain unclear. As long as the ECJ handles the matter the Austrian proceeding is stayed.

2.8         COSTS AND FEES

Generally, infringement proceedings are expensive. This is in principle also true for Austria. Right holders typically must invest substantial sums to (i) detect an infringement and identify the infringer; (ii) gather evidence of infringement; (iii) secure seizure, storage and ultimately destruction of infringing goods and (iv) finally, litigate a civil infringement action.  Although IP litigation in Austria leads to comparatively low litigation costs, the costs depend on various factors.

First of all, with respect to the legal costs under Austrian procedural law, a distinction must be made between (a) court fees (“Gerichtsgebühren”), (b) attorneys’ fees (“Rechtsanwaltsgebühren”) and (c) cash expenditure (“Barauslagen”) including costs for interpreters, the translation of documents, travel expenses for witnesses or experts’ costs.

The amounts required to pursue even the smallest infringers often run well over EUR 10,000. Recovery of costs is therefore a crucial point in the enforcement of IP rights for every right holder. At a rough estimate, 50 – 70 % of the actual legal costs expended by the right holder are typically recovered in successful Austrian civil IP cases. In simple cases it might even be possible to obtain 100% reimbursement of the legal costs based on the “loser pays principle”, meaning that the losing party not only bears its own costs but is also obliged to reimburse all procedural costs incurred by its prevailing opponent. Infringement proceedings thus harbour considerable cost risks for the parties.

Lawyers’ fees and fees of technical counsel (patent attorneys) are refundable (“loser pays principle”), if they accrued for appropriate legal measures, however, “only” according to the Code of Lawyer’s Tariff: Depending on the agreement with the lawyer and on the complexity of the case, the actual lawyer’s fees might therefore exceed the refundable costs pursuant to the Code of Lawyer’s Tariff. The general freedom to agree on a certain fee arrangement is substantially restricted as inter alia conditional fees (pacte de quota litis) are prohibited under Austrian laws.

2.9         PRELIMINARY INJUNCTION PROCEEDINGS

In all IP fields, one finds injunctive procedures, which permits, without the necessity of any urgency, to obtain within a few weeks cease and desist orders or orders for seizure. In Austria requests for preliminary injunctions in civil proceedings are often filed together with the full claim; however a separate filing is admissible, even after the full claim was filed.

It is worth mentioning that the “urgency issue in preliminary proceedings”, eg existing under German law, meaning that the application for a preliminary injunction has to be filed within the

shortest possible time after the right holder has become of the infringement, does not exist under Austrian laws. Under Austrian law, time limits are treated as a matter of substantive law and the fact that a claim has become time barred is not addressed by court on its own motion, but has to be brought forward by the defendant. The limitation period for IP infringements is generally three years, which begins to run on the day on which the right holder obtains positive knowledge of both the infringement and the infringing party.

In the majority of cases, the application for an injunction will be served on the defendant (Art. 6 ECHR), but the court may also grant ex parte injunctions if it can be established by the claimant that giving notice may defeat the purpose of the application. The court will form its view about the likely outcome of the definitive proceeding on the question of infringement and render its decision accordingly within a few weeks on the basis of legal opinions filed by the parties.

Other than the main proceedings the preliminary proceedings is a “summary proceeding”, meaning that no full proof but merely prima facie evidence is needed. On the other hand this prima facie evidence has to be presented to the court in the given, short time frame. When applying for a preliminary injunction the validity of registered IP rights has to be evidenced. The validity of registered IP rights is a rebuttable presumption in preliminary proceedings and may be contested by the defendant. Such contest however has to be substantiated. It is then the rights owner’s obligation to furnish prima facie evidence regarding the validity of the IP right.

The court may tie the issuance of a preliminary injunction to the provision of security.

If the preliminary injunction is – at the end of the day – considered to have been issued without substance, the defendant has the right to request full compensation by the injunction-requesting party.

As preliminary and definitive injunctions are in Austrian practice the most common and therefore most important claims in IP matters it is worth briefly showing how such injunctions are enforced: A petition can be filed with the court of enforcement (Exekutionsgericht) in

respect of each act of non-compliance following the enforceability of the claim, ie in case of a preliminary injunction immediately after its service. The petition has to be served by the enforcing party to the obliged party. Based on the petition and the alleged infringement the court can impose a fine up to EUR 100,000. For each further act of non-compliance with an injunction a further petition can be filed and a new fine can be imposed. Although the petition must include a concrete and conclusive allegation of the act of non-compliance it is not required to file any evidence of the non-compliance. However, the obliged party may initiate a (separate) proceeding in which the enforcing party is obliged to evidence the infringement. Preliminary and definitive injunctions are not effective against third parties, esp. against suppliers or customers of the infringing party, as those third parties have not been party of the proceedings. If those third parties can be sued by the IP right holder has to be evaluated based on the general requirements.

2.10    CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS

An intentional infringement of IP rights is a penal crime in Austria, that can be generally sanctioned with monetary fines and, for commercial crimes, can even lead up to imprisonment.

The conduct of criminal IP matters is under the exclusive jurisdiction of the Vienna Regional Court for Criminal Matters (LandesgerichtfürStrafsachen Wien) in 1st instance.

What makes criminal proceedings particularly attractive in Austria is the fact that the right holder, not the public prosecutor, can prosecute infringers himself. As the personal interest of the right holder in defending his rights outweighs the public interest in prosecuting counterfeiters, the legislator decided that only the right holder should have competence for filing an indictment. Even if this is an additional burden for right holders, it gives them much more control over the proceeding: They can decide whether to initiate proceedings, file applications (e.g. for house searches or destruction of counterfeit goods) or terminate the proceeding, which would not be the case in criminal proceedings initiated ex-officio.

3         BELGIUM

3.1         LEGAL FRAMEWORK

The judicial process is one of those matters which has been only harmonised a little within the European Union. Each country is relatively free to set the rules for procedures conducted before its national courts. However, states must act in accordance with the general principles, issuing, in particular, from the European Convention on Human Rights.

3.2         MAIN PRINCIPLES

3.2.1        The introduction of the case

Generally, the case will be introduced via a writ to which is attached a text in which the plaintiff presents their case file. This text, usually written by the plaintiff’s lawyer must contain sufficient information to enable the defendant to understand why a lawsuit is being filed.

In France, it is common to attach the exhibits in the file directly to this document. In Belgium, the exhibits will be transmitted between lawyers, later on.

If the defendant is outside the EU, there are deadlines to allow them to take cognizance of the existence of a trial and organise themselves taking into account the distance. To counter this, it is not uncommon that the plaintiff attempts to obtain parallel emergency measures (see-above), which multiplies the number of simultaneously administered legal proceedings.

3.2.2        Pleadings and pre-trial

The purpose of the Pre-trial procedure is to allow the parties to draw up their pleadings. This is a text in which they each explain why they believe themselves to be justified. The findings conclude with a summary of what the party is asking the court to grant them.

In principle, it is the defendant who initially produces a submission. The applicant responds. The defendant may further respond, and so on. Respect for the rights of the defence means that the defendant has in principle the last word.

Whenever pleadings are exchanged, they must be accompanied by the exhibits (contracts, letters, documents, etc.) referred to therein, unless these exhibits have been previously submitted.

In France, the pre-trial procedure is frequently assigned to a judge who takes care of this matter only. This has the advantage of flexibility, because the deadlines can be changed as and when required by the investigation and, if a problem arises, the judge decides on it immediately. Once the case is ready, it is sent to a different judge who will decide the dispute.

In Belgium, the pre-trial is more automatic. Deadlines are set early in the process and it is extremely difficult to change them later. This has the advantage of predictability, but the rigidity of the system is sometimes excessive.

3.2.3        Public hearing

Once the case is ready, the lawyers will be heard at the hearing. They propound their arguments orally. In civil and commercial matters, arguments rarely extend over several hearings. The purpose of the hearing(s) is to summarise the case and not to pass to full review as it would be done in an international arbitration or a criminal matter.

3.2.4        Judgment

After the hearing, the lawyers will receive the judgment, often by post or electronic transmission. This may take a few days to weeks, depending on the number of cases to be treated, their complexity and the potential urgency.

3.3         THE APPEAL

Most of the time, an appeal can be made.

The appeal is a new proceeding. The procedure follows the same principles as those outlined above. Despite rumours, it has never been demonstrated that having won or lost in the first proceedings has any impact on the chances of success at appeal.

3.4         CASSATION (NATIONAL SUPREME COURT)

The appeal in cassation is relatively rare.

The Cassation court is not concerned with the facts and does not say who is right or wrong.  It will only verify that the procedure has been followed, and that the judge has applied the law correctly. It is therefore not a matter of re-hearing the case, contrary to what occurs on appeal.

3.5         THE PRELIMINARY RULING QUESTION BEFORE THE EUROPEAN COURT

In disputes involving technology, IP and/or innovation, the rules are very often derived from a European directive or regulation.

When a judge in a national court has doubts as to the exact scope of a European directive or regulation or questions the compatibility of national legislation with the European statute from which it is derived, the judge has opportunity to ask a question to the Court of Justice of the European Union.

There is only one Court of Justice for the whole of the European Union, located in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. It is the sole authority to interpret a directive or European regulation. In principle, all lawyers are admitted to plead before the CJEU; however, it is recommended to hire someone with some experience of this specific procedure.

In its considerations, the Court will not decide the dispute submitted to it. It will only inform the judge in the national court on the exact scope or meaning of the Directive or the European law in question, and tell the judge whether national law is compatible with the European statute.

It will then be for the judge in the national court which has asked the question to settle the dispute, in strict interpretation of what has been laid down by the European Court.

3.6         LAWYERS’ FEES

At the end of the proceedings, the judge has the opportunity of imposing all or part of the defence costs of the winning party on the unsuccessful party.

In France, the scope of the judge is relatively wide. Most of the time, the judge can take into account all the elements that are submitted to determine the amount that he/she considers appropriate. Of course, the fact that one of the parties is foreign can be taken into account because it creates an additional cost of defence, translation, etc.

In Belgium, the scope of the judge is limited. A base amount is provided for in law and the judge may only increase or decrease this to some extent to take into account the specificities of the case. The basic amount is determined according to what is at stake.

In both countries, it is rare that this system makes it possible to cover all lawyers’ fees.

3.7         CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS

Criminal proceedings operate under different rules. Without going into the details of these specific proceedings, we can report the following main thrusts:

  • In most cases, once a complaint is filed, the plaintiff loses control over it, so much so that it is often impossible to stop the complaint even if an agreement is reached with the other party (it is some sort of “fire and forget” missile).
  • On the level of evidence, the complainant has not much to do. Once the criminal authorities are notified of a complaint, they will organise the investigation and take the necessary measures. This has a significant advantage in terms of costs. On the other hand, this shows once again the loss of control of the complainant in relation to their complaint.
  • The investigation is conducted by authorities who are neutral in principle. They will instruct on uptake and completion. The prosecutor and the investigating judge do not judge, they investigate.
  • Once the investigation is complete, they pass the case to another judge who will make a judgment after having heard the parties at a public hearing.
  • The investigation is secret in principle. Depending on the circumstances, this secrecy may even be opposed by the parties that are involved. Whether you are suspect or complainant, it is often difficult to know in which direction the investigation is moving. Moreover, regular leaks in the press are to be deplored. In sensitive cases, this means that one must be always ready to respond in terms of communication.
  • When a case involves both a criminal investigation and civil or commercial proceedings, it is the criminal investigation which takes precedence. Civil or commercial proceedings will normally be suspended while the criminal investigation is ongoing.

As a result of the workload of the investigators and also the frequency of cases that involve several countries, it is not uncommon for criminal proceedings to last for several years.

4         BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

4.1         LEGAL FRAMEWORK

Bosnia and Herzegovina is a complex country which consists of three political entities: Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Republic of Srpska and Brcko District. As a consequence, civil procedure in Bosnia and Herzegovina is governed by the Law on Civil Procedure of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina[9] ,  the Law on Civil Procedure of the Republic of Srpska[10] ,  and the Law on Civil Procedure of Brcko District[11] ,  whereas criminal procedure is governed by the Law on Criminal Procedure of Bosnia and Herzegovina[12],  the Law on Criminal Procedure of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina [13], the Law on Criminal Procedure of the Republic of Srpska[14]  and the Law on Criminal Procedure of Brcko District[15].  The organization and competence of the courts are governed by the Laws on Civil Procedure, as well as the Laws on Criminal Procedure. Bosnia and Herzegovina is not yet a member of the European Union, and therefore, the EU laws and regulations are not applicable in this jurisdiction.

4.2         MAIN PRINCIPLES

The main principles of civil procedure can be summarized as follows:

  1. a) Civil Law procedure is governed by the Law on Civil Procedure that differs for each entity. Likewise, each entity has its own system of courts. In the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, IP related cases are handled in the first instance by the Municipal Courts and by the Cantonal Courts in the second instance. In the Republic of Srpska, IP related cases are handled in the first instance by the District Commercial Courts and by the Higher Commercial Courts in the second instance. In Brcko District, IP related cases are handled in the first instance by the Basic Court and by the Court of Appeal in the second instance. The Supreme Court of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina handles extraordinary legal remedies against the decisions of all courts from its territorial jurisdictions, while the Supreme Court of the Republic of Srpska handles extraordinary legal remedies against the decisions of all courts from its own jurisdiction.
  2. b) Bosnian courts are not legally bound by previous judgments. Nevertheless, the Supreme Court and the second-instance courts publish their decisions to provide guidance for lower courts. These courts tend to harmonize the administration of justice within the Bosnian judiciary system, mainly by means of rendering uniformity of decisions. However, since the legal system is split between three entities, in practice, this is sometimes rather difficult to achieve.
  3. c) Sending a cease and desist letter (hereinafter: C&D Letter) is not an obligatory step before commencing a civil action, but it is certainly recommendable. Sending such a letter would show an effort of the right holder to open a dialogue and its dedication to resolve the dispute amicably. Moreover, it is not a rare situation (especially in IP infringement cases) that the adverse party is willing to comply with the demands from the C&D Letter in order to avoid expensive and time-consuming litigation which would likely lead to an unfavorable outcome.
  4. d) The official languages of the proceedings are Serbian, Bosnian and Croatian. In the event that a party does not speak any of the three official languages or where the documents and evidences are presented in languages different from the official languages, the assistance of the Court appointed translators is obligatory.

4.3         IMPORTANT MILESTONES OF A TRIAL

4.3.1        First instance procedure and judgement

The trial must be initiated before the competent courts of first instance. A case is initially introduced when the plaintiff submits the written complaint to the competent court. The parties may be represented pro se or by an Attorney at Law (there are also several additional exceptions related to representation that are not in the scope of this article).

As soon as the complaint is received, the Court will perform a formal examination of the same, in which the Court checks whether all obligatory requirements are fulfilled. If the complaint contains some formal deficiencies, the Court will allow correction thereof, within a certain deadline.

Thirty days upon receiving the complaint, the Court will deliver the same to the defendant for a response which the defendant must submit within 30 days.

Afterwards, the Court will schedule a preliminary hearing which is an obligatory step of the proceedings. At the preliminary hearing, both parties are invited to state all the necessary facts, to propose evidence and to state an opinion about the allegations of the adverse party. The law is rather strict about presenting evidence after the preliminary hearing is concluded, and late presentation of the same will be allowed only when exceptional reasons exist (e.g. the party was not aware of the existence of evidence at the time the preliminary hearing was held). Upon the conclusion of the preliminary hearing, the Court will schedule the main hearing (i.e. trial).

The main hearing represents the main stage of the proceedings in which the merits of the dispute are discussed. Although intended to be held as one hearing, in practice it is commonly divided into several hearings. At the main hearing, all evidence accepted by the Court in the preliminary hearing will be presented. Additionally, the parties will present their arguments in order to enable the Court to make a conclusion as the basis for the decision.

Regarding the evidence, many various types are admissible (witness testimony, expert opinion etc.), but in most cases, the evidence is presented to the Court in the form of written documents. Unless the law provides otherwise, the burden of proof lies with the party which claims the existence of fact necessary for the establishing and/or enforcing of certain right.

When the Court considers that the legal matter has been thoroughly discussed and clarified, so that the decision can be rendered, it will close the main hearing. Upon the closure of the main hearing, the Court will render the judgement. Besides deciding on the merits of the case, the Court will also decide on the costs of the proceedings.

4.3.2        The Appeal

First instance judgements can always be appealed by submitting the written appeal within 15 or 30 days (depending on the entity) following the date of delivery of the written judgment. As a general rule, new evidence and new facts may be presented only if the party submitting the appeal becomes aware of such facts or evidence after the conclusion of the main hearing in the first instance proceedings. The judgment may be appealed in respect of both procedural and substantive omissions in the first-instance proceedings.

4.3.3        Revision (Supreme Court)

A request for revision can be filed with the Supreme Court within 15 or 30 days (depending on the entity) after the decision has been delivered to the party. The revision can be filed due to both procedural and substantive omissions in the proceedings. However, the list of particular omissions which might be a basis for revision is narrower than the reasons for appeal.

There are no specific rules for revision for IP related disputes, so the general principles apply.

In the revision proceedings, the party must be represented by an Attorney at Law, or if the party is a natural person who has passed the bar exam, he or she can represent himself or herself.  An employee of a legal entity who has passed the bar exam can also represent that entity in revision proceedings.

4.4         PROCEDURAL COSTS

The costs of the proceedings are, in principle, imposed on the losing party by the Court. However, the Court can waive all or part of the costs, if the party has no resources or its financial situation cannot endure such costs (upon the party’s request). In situations where the party has partially succeeded in the proceedings, the Court will decide the percentage of the costs that each party will bear.

The official fees are determined in accordance with the Law on Court Fees (each political entity has its own Law).  The fees in each particular case will depend on the value of the legal matter they are related to. Moreover, the costs differ for civil and criminal proceedings.

Attorneys’ fees can vary depending on the complexity of the case, its length, the number of activities undertaken and other particulars of each case. It is therefore recommendable to consult with the attorney on all potential costs of the proceedings before initiating the same.

4.5         PRELIMINARY INJUNCTION PROCEEDINGS

In cases of urgency, an interested party can seek a preliminary injunction (hereinafter: PI), in order to provide provisional, but immediate legal protection. The request can be submitted to the competent Court during the proceedings, but also before the proceedings are initiated – under the condition that the complaint will be filed within a certain deadline from the date on which the decision granting the PI was rendered.

In general, preliminary injunctions are governed by the Laws on Civil Procedure, but specific rules related to IP rights are promulgated by their individual, related laws (e.g. Law on Patents, Law on Trademarks, etc.). The content of the PI can vary according to the type of right at issue.

The specific character of each IP right notwithstanding, we can underline the following as the most common PI remedies in the Bosnian legal system: 1) seizure or removal from the market of the infringing products; 2) seizure of the means (equipment, tools) used in the creation of the infringing products; 3) prohibition of continuation of the infringing actions.

The party that seeks issuance of the PI bears the burden of proof that the infringement did occur, and it must justify the issuance of the same.

If an appeal is filed against the decision granting the PI, the same does not stay the enforcement of the PI.

In exceptional circumstances, the court will allow the issuance of an ex parte PI.

4.6         CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS

Bosnia and Herzegovina and each other political entity have their own Laws on Criminal Procedure. The common characteristics of these procedures are the following:

The general rules for the territorial and material competence of the courts is applicable for criminal proceedings. The competence of each particular court depends on the nature of the criminal act and prescribed penalty for the same.

Criminal proceedings commence with the investigation. The investigating authorities (i.e. police) conduct the investigation upon the order of the prosecutor and under his or her supervision. In most cases, the injured party has no control over the criminal proceedings, but there are certain mechanisms that enable a more active role in the case. The injured party cannot assume the prosecutor’s place in any circumstance, but the prosecutor’s decision to withdraw from the case can be appealed by the injured party.

If the evidence collected during the investigation confirms the guilt of the defendant beyond a reasonable doubt, the prosecutor files an indictment and represents the charge before the competent court.

The court may proceed only upon an indictment and is restricted by its contents: the court may only establish the criminal liability of the person against whom the accusatory instrument was filed, and may only consider acts contained in the instrument. For that reason, the prosecutor is entitled to amend the indictment and the legal qualification of the criminal charges throughout the proceedings.

5         BULGARIA

5.1         LEGAL FRAMEWORK

The national IP legislation is generally harmonized and in conformity with the European law, reproducing a number of the requirements of the relevant EU directives and regulations, and is aligned with the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPs).

The basic legal acts in the IP field are:

  • Copyright and Neighbouring Rights Acts from 1993
  • Patents and Registration of Utility Models Act from 1993
  • Marks and Geographical Indications Act from 1999
  • Industrial Design Act from 1999
  • Topology of Integrated Circuits Act from 1999
  • Penal Code from 1968

However, the Bulgarian court system suffers from the lack of specialized IP courts and although the claims for establishment and cessation of an infringement of IP rights are considered in accordance with the procedure for summary proceedings, it would take some time until a right holder obtains an enforceable decision within proceedings on the merits.

5.2         MAIN PRINCIPLES

Civil procedures are based on the following principles:

  1. Civil proceedings are based on the Civil Procedure Code which regulates a three – instance court procedure.
  2. Sofia City Court which has the statute of a district court is the first-instance court in civil cases related to infringement of IP rights in a panel of one judge, except for the disputes under the Copyright and Neighbouring Rights Act which are considered by all district courts in the country. The appellate courts (5 in total) only have second-instance competence over appeals against decisions and rulings of the district courts within its venue rendered in their capacity of first-instance courts. The appellate court sits in a panel of three judges, unless otherwise provided for by law. The third and final instance is the Supreme Court of Cassation (SCC). Very limited number of cases is admitted for cassation review. The seat of the SCC is in Sofia and has jurisdiction over the whole territory of the Republic of Bulgaria. The SCC sits in panels of three judges, unless otherwise provided for by law.
  3. The language of the proceedings is Bulgarian. All evidence submitted has to be in Bulgarian or translated into Bulgarian by a certified translator.

In general, the following claims are admissible in the context of the exclusive IP rights:

  • claim for finding of an infringement;
  • claim for discontinuance of the infringement;
  • claim for compensation of the damages;
  • claim for seizure and destruction of goods subject to infringement, as well as of the tools used for commitment of the infringement;
  • claim for delivery of the goods subject of the infringement;
  • claim for payment of the expenses related to the storage and destruction of the goods, subject of the infringement;
  • announcement of the court decision in two daily newspapers and via a TV channel with national coverage.

Invalidity of registered IP rights (trademarks, designs, patents, utility models, etc.) could be claimed within administrative proceedings, where the first instance should be the Bulgarian Patent Office. Its decision on the merits could be subject to court revision before the specialized administrative courts in Bulgaria: Sofia City Administrative Court as a second instance and the Supreme Administrative Court as a third and final instance.

Administrative proceedings for sanctioning of IP rights infringers are also in place. While copyright infringements are investigated and sanctioned by the Ministry of Culture, administrative infringements related to registered IP rights are in the competence of the Bulgarian Patent Office. In both proceedings the final act of the competent administrative authority is subject to two instance court appeal, where the competent courts are Sofia Regional Court and Sofia City Administrative Court.

Criminal proceedings are also available and the procedure is initiated by the public prosecutor office.  The competent criminal courts are regional court, appellative court and the final instance – the SCC.

Enforcing IP rights at the border is an efficient way to quickly and effectively provide legal protection to the right-holder and the procedure in Bulgaria has been harmonized with the EU regulations in the field of customs enforcement of IP rights.

5.3         IMPORTANT MILESTONES OF THE TRIAL

5.3.1        First instance procedure

First-instance proceedings commence by bringing the claim before the court in writing. The claimant specifies all the facts and submits all the written evidence the claim is grounded on in the statement of claim. If the claim is admissible, the judge sends a copy of it and its attachments to the defendant with instructions of the opportunities and necessities to submit a reply to the claim as well as instructions on the mandatory contents of the reply and on the consequences if it is not submitted. The court schedules the hearing of the case with subpoenaing the parties wherein evidence is collected. The court can also make known to the parties its draft of the report on the case, as well as direct them to mediation or another procedure for amicable resolution of the dispute.

 

The task of the open court session (open hearings) is specified as collecting of the evidence in the case and conducting the oral pleadings of the parties. Usually in IP infringement procedures experts are appointed in order to support the court in replying to specific IP questions for which the court is not competent to respond during the proceedings. The oral pleadings start only if all the evidence sought by the parties and admitted by the court is collected and the trial has been concluded. The court announces its decision with the motives within a one-month term following the session in which the consideration of the case was terminated.

The claims for establishment and cessation of an infringement of IP rights are considered in accordance with the special procedure for summary proceedings. The preparation of the case is carried out in camera without subpoenaing the parties on the day of receipt of the defendant’s reply or of the expiry of the term for submitting the said reply. The court schedules a hearing of the case for a date within three weeks and prepares a written report on the case. The cases considered according to summary procedure are heard in an open session with subpoenaing the parties. During the said session the court collects the brought in and presented evidence and hears the oral pleadings. The court sets a day whereon it is to announce its decision and which shall be the day as from which the term for appeal of the decision shall begin to run. The court is obligated to announce its decision, together with the motives for it, within a two-week term following the session in which the consideration of the case was concluded.

5.3.2        Judgment and further Appeals

When a judgment has been reached by the competent court, it could be appealed  before the appellative court. The appeal is filed with the court that rendered the decision within fourteen days of the date of serving party with the decision. This term is preclusive. If the decision is not appealed within the said term, it takes effect. Grounds for an appeal can be found when, for example, a first-instance decision has been proclaimed invalid, wrongful due to procedural omissions, inadmissible, and, in the presence of evidence – of non-compliance with substantive law.

5.3.3        Revision (Supreme Court)

The cassation appeal in Bulgarian procedure law is provided for as a regular, but not always possible due to the limit admissibility of third instance control. The decisions subject to cassation appeal to the SCC are the intermediate appellate decisions of the district and appellate courts. Cassation appeal must be filed in a 1-month term after delivery of the appealed decision to the party. Cassation appeal does not apply to any decisions on civil cases with an appealable interest not exceeding EUR 2,500 and commercial cases with an appealable interest not exceeding EUR 10,000. The intermediate appellate decisions are subject to cassation appeal provided the court has pronounced on a substantive law matter which: (1) has been determined in conflict with the practice of the SCC; (2) has been determined by the courts in a conflicting manner; (3) is relevant to the accurate application of the law, as well as to the progress of law. This outlines the grounds for admitting a cassation appeal and creates a filter which sets limits to the cassation appeal.

5.4         THE PRELIMINARY RULING QUESTION BEFORE THE EU COURT OF JUSTICE

Every Bulgarian judge has the right to send a question to the Court of Justice of the European Union for a preliminary ruling. In order for a case to be admissible before the CJEU, the question arising from it must not have been decided already.

If the requested Bulgarian court does not act as a final instance, it is free to grant or reject the request for preliminary ruling, and its decision will not be subject to appeal. However, if it acts as a last instance, the court is obliged to exercise the reference for a preliminary ruling, unless the answer to the question derives clearly and unambiguously from a previous judgment of the CJEU or the significance and the meaning of the provision or the act are clear enough.

In general, Bulgarian courts are reluctant to ask preliminary ruling questions to the CJEU.

5.5         COSTS AND FEES

Where civil proceedings are conducted, in general a state fee of 4 % of the value of the claim is due. In an IP litigation process, costs and fees may vary depending on the type of the proceeding, as well as depending on whether experts have been appointed to support the court in replying to specific IP questions. Administrative procedures related to registered IP rights require payment of state fees in the range EUR 150 – EUR 300.  Administrative and criminal procedures related to IP infringements or offences do not require payment of a state fee.

The costs for an appeal procedure are lower than the ones which occur in the first-instance.

The fees and costs for the proceedings, as well as the attorney’s remuneration (if there is such) are paid by the defendant in proportion to the upheld part of the claim. It is worth noting that where the amount paid by a party to the attorney exceeds the amount corresponding to the actual legal and factual complexity of the case, the court might adjudicate a lower amount of costs upon the request of the opposing party, however, the latter cannot be lower than the minimum amount specified in the tariff to the Bar Act. The tariff to the Bar Act sets minimum amounts of the attorney fees in various court and administrative proceedings or legal consultancy work.

5.6         PRELIMINARY INJUNCTION PROCEEDINGS

No such court order as the preliminary injunction exists under the Bulgarian legislation. However, the Bulgarian law provides for the so called ‘provisional measures’ which could be imposed by the civil court at the request of the person seeking civil protection against IP infringement. The following provisional measures are admissible:

  • ban on any actions that allegedly constitute or shall constitute unauthorized use;
  • seizure of the goods which allegedly infringe IP rights, as well as of any other evidence relevant to prove the infringement;
  • taking out of use of the material intended to be used for IP infringement;
  • sealing of the premises where allegedly the infringement is being committed or is going to be committed.

The prerequisites for imposing of one or more provisional measures without prior notice to the alleged infringer are statement that an IP infringement has been committed or is going to be committed or evidence is likely to be lost; and presenting written evidence which justify admissibility and equity of the claim. The provisional measures could be requested both before filing the claim on the merits and after initiation of court proceedings. If the request precedes filing of the claim and a provisional measure is enacted by the court, the person seeking protection against IP infringement should present evidence for filing the claim in up to one-month term after ruling of the court for enactment of the provisional measure (the court decides what should be the term for filing of the court claim). The enforcement of the provisional measures if allowed by the court (except for the ban on unauthorized use) shall be conducted by a bailiff.

5.7         CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS

 

The wilful infringement of IP rights is considered a crime under the Bulgarian law and it could be sanctioned with monetary fines of up to EUR 25,000 and imprisonment of up to 8 years in exceptional cases.

Criminal proceedings operate under different rules than described above. The main procedure is regulated by the Criminal Procedure Code. Such procedures are typically initiated by the public prosecutor following further investigation by competent investigating authorities. Afterwards, the court may begin the prosecution against the defendant. The persons who suffered damages resulting from the crime are entitled to bring a civil claim for damages in criminal proceedings and become civil claimants. The criminal proceedings are preferred by right holders which do not have the resources to collect evidence of the IP infringement themselves and rely on the evidence collected by the public prosecution.

6         DENMARK

6.1         LEGAL FRAMEWORK

The judicial process has only been harmonized a little within the European Union, and each country is therefore relatively free to set their own rules for procedures conducted before its national courts. However, every state must act in accordance with the general principles in the European Convention on Human Rights.

6.2         MAIN PRINCIPLES

The Danish Courts consists of:

  • the Supreme Court
  • two High Courts
  • the Maritime and Commercial Court
  • the Land Registration Court
  • 24 district courts
  • the courts of the Faroe Islands and Greenland
  • the Appeals Permission Board
  • the Special Court of Indictment and Revision
  • the Judicial Appointments Council
  • the Danish Court Administration.

Unlike many other European countries, Denmark does not have special administrative or constitutional courts. Instead, the normal courts have to review the legality of public decisions or questions concerning conflicts with the Constitutional Act of Denmark (in Danish: Grundloven).

Denmark has specific committees and boards handling complaints, for example are complaints regarding fixation of rent are handled by The Housing and Rent Assessment Committee. It is very normal that these committees and boards have judges from the above-mentioned courts as members.

In Denmark, the courts are independent from the executive and legislative authorities. Section 3, 61 and 63 of the Constitutional Act of Denmark form the legal basis and provides for the division of power between the executive, the judicial and the legislative systems.

The Danish civil process is based on the rules of the Danish Administration of Justice Act and is based on a principle of negotiation between the parties.

In regards to the principle of negotiation the Danish judges can, during their voting, only consider elements that have been presented to them, for example pleadings, evidence and oral statements. It is elementary that the judges only consider what the parties have presented, but in rare cases the judges can at their own initiative decide to do their own examination of the case (ex officio examination) but this is only performed when the judges are not sufficiently informed by the parties. It is therefore very important to present the judges with all information that is beneficial to the party.

The judge can only base his or her decision on the information provided, so if party (A) does not provide sufficient material or materials at the other party’s (B) request, it can cause procedural adverse effect towards party (A).

The Danish judges have free access to appraisal of evidence, and the Danish judges have a constitutional right that provides them a special protection against dismissal and transfer from their job. A Danish judge can only be removed from his job if action is filed against him and the Special Court of Appeals rules that he should be dismissed from his job. Otherwise the office of judge is irredeemable until the judge turns 70 years of age.

6.3         MILESTONES OF A TRIAL PROCEDURE

6.3.1        Introduction of the case

A case is initially introduced to the courts with the submission of a written writ of summons in which the plaintiff presents his case. The writ of summons, usually written by the plaintiff’s lawyer, must contain sufficient information to enable the defendant to understand why a lawsuit is being filed. The requirements are outlined in section 351 of the Danish Administration of Justice Act and include, among others, a factual presentation of the case, the plaintiff’s suggestion to the handling of the case as well as a clear description of the plaintiff’s claims. In Denmark, it is common to attach only the exhibits, which are referred to in the writ of summons or following pleadings.

6.3.2        Pleadings and pre-trial

After receiving the writ of summons, the court assesses if the writ of summons is submitted to the correct jurisdiction or otherwise the court will refer the case. If the writ of summons is submitted correctly, the court can decide that the defendant has to send a statement of defence within 14 days, but it is normal to extend the deadline.

When the court receives the statement of defence, the court can convene the parties to a pre-trial hearing, unless the court assesses that such a meeting is unnecessary. These meetings are normally handled over the phone. During this meeting, the parties can discuss how they relate to the case, if an expert opinion is required, if there is any chance of a settlement as well as the time and date for the court hearing. The court can decide if there is any need for further pleadings (in Danish: replik and duplik) or meetings.

In Denmark, the deadlines are set early in the process and it can be difficult to change them later on unless the court is provided with a reasonable explanation. This has the advantage of predictability, but the rigidity of the system is sometimes excessive.

Whenever pleadings are exchanged, the exhibits referred to herein (contracts, letters, documents, etc.) must accompany the pleadings, unless these exhibits have been submitted earlier on.

Unless the parties are able to settle the case during the pre-trial process, the case will be handled by the court at the date suggested at the pre-trial hearing and agreed by the parties.

6.3.3        Public hearing

It is a mandatory rule in Denmark that all processes in the court room is to be done oral, even though most proceedings require the preparation of written pleadings. Even when the law allows oral considerations, it is recommended to submit written evidence.

The proceedings are therefore oral and the courts are generally open for the public.

6.3.4        Judgment

After the hearing, the lawyers will receive the court’s judgment, often by post or electronic transmission. Normally it takes four weeks for the judgment to arrive.

6.3.5        Appeal

Most of the time, an appeal can be made.

The appeal is a new proceeding where the purpose is to determine whether the previous judgment is correct or incorrect. Claims and allegations which have not been relied upon in the first instance can only be included if approved by the court following the opposing party’s objection. The procedure follows the same principles as those outlined above.

The High Courts

There are two high courts in Denmark – the High Court of Western Denmark and the High Court of Eastern Denmark. Appeals from a district court are referred to the high courts. Civil and criminal cases are tried by the district courts (first tier), but under certain conditions a civil case may be referred to a high court.

The Supreme Court

The Supreme Court is the final court of appeal in Denmark and is situated in Copenhagen. The Supreme Court reviews judgments and orders from the High Court of Eastern Denmark, the High Court of Western Denmark and the Copenhagen Maritime and Commercial Court.

The Supreme Court reviews both civil and criminal cases and is the final court of appeal (third tier) in probate, bankruptcy, enforcement and land registration cases. In criminal cases, the Supreme Court does not review the question of guilt or innocence, as well as there are no lay judges on the Supreme Court panel. It is only in exceptional cases where a right of appeal (third tier) to the Supreme Court is permitted (see below).

6.4         THE PRELIMINARY RULING QUESTION BEFORE THE EUROPEAN COURT

In disputes involving technology, IP and/or innovation, the rules are very often derived from a European directive or regulation.

From studying the Danish laws it can be observed that there are several Danish laws which implement EU law directives. A directive is often implemented by adding new sections to an existent Danish law concerning the related legislative area.

6.5         LAWYERS’ FEES

All parties shall pay costs associated with any procedural steps the party has made or requested. However, it is common for the Court to impose the costs on the losing party.

In Denmark, it is possible to get a free trial process. The Appeals Permission Board determines when a party shall have free process. The conditions for free process are outlined in the Danish Administration of Justice Act.

6.6         CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS

Criminal proceedings operate under different rules that can be found in the Danish Administration of Justice Act, and some of the articles in the

Danish Copyright Act contain penal provisions for infringements.

Often the research and collecting of evidence is the most substantial part of the criminal proceedings, particular if the judges have their main focus on the expert appraisals.

6.7         JURISDICTION AND VENUE

Normally the Maritime and Commercial Court have jurisdiction in cases concerning intellectual property. The second instance in cases beginning in the Maritime and Commercial Court is the Supreme Court. This is a modification to other civil cases, which begins in a district court and can be appealed to one of the High Courts.

Where the case concerns intellectual property or IT-rights, it is very common that the parties reach an agreement via arbitration. The primary benefit of arbitration is that the case can be solved quicker, in confidentiality and the involved parties avoid any attention that might have a negative effect on their business or brand.

It is normal to have a negotiated clause regarding meditation or dispute resolution in agreements between parties. The purpose of the clause is to find consensus without spending time and money.

7         FRANCE

The organization of the Courts, and the principles of civil procedure, are still fully subject to national legislation. France is a civil law country; as a result, evidence is largely based on documentation and not on witness testimonies.

7.1         MAIN PRINCIPLES

All French laws are grouped into Codes : procedural rules are to be found in the Code of civil procedure; general principles of civil law are laid down in the Civil code while IP legislations are in the Code of intellectual property.

French attorneys can represent their clients in all French courts, except before the French Supreme Court (Cour de Cassation), to which only a handfull of lawyers residing in Paris are admitted.

All attorneys are members of a regional Bar Association. When they defend a client before a court, which is outside of the scope of their Bar Association, for instance if an attorney from Paris, member of the Bar of Paris, defends a client in Lyon or Lille, he must then use “a local correspondant”, member of these Bars, even though he will be going to Lyon and Lille to plead the case on behalf of his client.

7.2         IMPORTANT MILESTONES

  1. In IP cases, the plaintiff often requests through an ex-parte application the right to seize what he considers to be infringing products, often on the premises or in the warehouses of the defendant. Within one month following this seizure, the plaintiff must bring the matter before a court, otherwise the seizure will be considered as void and its effects will be cancelled.
  2. Otherwise, all civil cases start by a claim delivered by the plaintiff to the defendant through a bailiff. A copy of this claim so delivered is then registered at the offices (greffe) of the Court which is competent to hear the case on the merits.
  3. If the matter is within the competence of the District court, then the attorney of the defendant has 2 weeks togo on the court record on behalf of the defendant, and 2 more months when the defendant is not located in France.
  4. The case is handled by a judge who “administers the case” (juge de la mise en Etat). He will ensure that both parties exchange the documents they refer to in their respective briefs (pleadings). The defendant has usually 2 months to respond to the claim, and the plaintiff will have also around 2 months to respond to the 1st brief of the defendant, who will then have 2 months to respond to this last brief. In most cases, separately from the initial claim the plaintiff produces another brief, where the defendant produces a total of 2 briefs. But for complex cases they can be authorized to produce as many briefs as necessary. Once the parties have exchanged all their arguments the case is transferred to a different judge for the public hearing and oral arguments (the trial).

The pleadings at trial are usually quite short (in average a maximum of 45 minutes for each parties).  They take place after a short presentation of the case by one of the judges who hear the case. At the District court of Paris the judgments are rendered in writing approximately 6 weeks after the pleading date.

Summary of the usual timeline:

  • (Seizure ? If so, a claim must be brought within 30 days);
  • Claim delivered by the Plaintiff to the Defendant;
  • Defendant must register his attorney (within 2 weeks or 2 months for a foreign defendant);
  • A judge is appointed to administer the case : he verifies if the documents on which the claim is based have been given to the attorney of the defendant;
  • The attorney of the defendant has approximately 2 months to produce a 1st brief in defence and in response to the initial claim;
  • The attorney of the plaintiff has approximately 2 months to produce a 1st brief in response to the 1st reply (defence) of the defendant;
  • The attorney of the defendant has approximately 2 months to produce a 2nd brief in defence and in response to the reply of the plaintiff;
  • Once the parties have exchanged all their arguments the case is “closed” and a date for the trial is set;
  • Trial;
  • One or two months after the trial a judgment is rendered in writing.

7.3         FIRST INSTANCE PROCEDURE

The District Court of Paris has been, for a few years, the sole and exclusive jurisdiction to hear patent cases, as well as cases involving Community Designs and Community Trademarks.

Regarding all other cases involving author’s rights, French designs and French trademarks they are of the  exclusive competence of 10 district courts (including Paris).

On contract matters, including controversies over licensing agreements raised between two companies, these remain under the jurisdiction of commercial courts.

In the district courts, all the judges are professional judges, who have studied law and who have also gone to a “judge school”, whereas in the commercial courts the judges are elected businessmen, who may or not have a law degree.

All the IP/IT matters which are brought before the District Court of Paris, are handled by the 3rd Chamber, which comprises 4 sections. Each section comprises a presiding judge and two other magistrates, thus a total of 3 judges. These judges are not specialized in IP/IT, but they become specialists in this field by their daily practice in this 3rd Chamber, where they stay an average of 3 to 6 years.

Each section handles patent, trademark, design and copyright cases. None of the sections is more specialized in one of these fields than another. None of the judges have a technical training or degree, as is often the case in other countries.

It takes approximately 18 months from the claim for a case to be judged by one of the sections of the 3rd Chamber of the Court of Paris on the merits.

7.4         JUDGMENTS AND FURTHER APPEALS

Within one month after their official notification, all judgments rendered by a District Court of Paris, can be appealed before a Court of Appeal. In Paris, all the judgments of 1st instance rendered by the 3rd Chamber of the District Court in IP/IT matters are rewieved on appeal by the 1st and 2nd Chambers of the 5thPôle of the Court of Appeal of Paris.

Each of these two chambers, comprises a president and two other magistrates, among which, very often one or more former judges of the 3rd Chamber of the District Court.

Statistically only, approximately 25% of the judgments rendered on 1st Instance are reversed by the Court of Appeal.

7.5         REVISION (SUPREME COURT)

Within 2 months after their official notification, judgments of the Court of Appeal can be subject to the review of the French Supreme Court (Court de Cassation), but only on points of law and not on factual issues.

It takes around 2 years for a case to be reviewed by the Supreme court. Approximately 10% of the civil judgments are reversed, against 4% of the criminal cases. Once reversed the cases are brought back to be heard and judged again by another Court of Appeal.

7.6         PRELIMINARY RULING QUESTION BEFORE THE EUROPEAN COURT OF JUSTICE

French judges are very reluctant to ask preliminary ruling questions to

the European Court of Justice. For instance, as of May 15th, 2014, the 3rd Chamber of the District court of Paris has only asked one preliminary question to the European Court of Justice, in the landmark trademark cases of « SadasVertBaudet v/LTJ Diffusion » also know as « Arthur v/Arthur and Felicie » (C-291/00, March 20, 2003).

The French Supreme Court asks for preliminary ruling questions only when it is literally forced to do so.

7.7         COSTS AND FEES

The losing party is, in principle, always ordered to pay the attorney’s fees and costs of the other party, the so-called sums awarded by application of article 700 of the Civil procedural code (Cpc).

The amounts awarded by application of this article 700 Cpc depend on various factors, and they are often higher in patent cases than in trademark or copyright cases. But in the past years their average amount has increased, around 20.000 € for a trademark, design or copyright case, to an average of 50.000 € in patent cases.

7.8         PRELIMINARY INJUNCTION PROCEEDINGS

In all IP fields, one finds injunctive procedures, which permits a party, depending on the urgency, to obtain within hours or within a few weeks cease and desists orders, and even sometimes, provisonnal damages.

7.9         CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS

An increasing number of IP cases are subject, not to civil, but to criminal proceedings, initiated usually by the Customs authorities.

The main issue, and difficulty for the defendant, is that in criminal proceedings the cases are heard by the criminal court which has jurisdiction over the place where the seizure took place.

For instance for goods seized in the harbor of Le Havre, the cases will be within the competence of the public prosecutor and of the criminal court of Le Havre, even though they are not specialized in IP/IT. One must note that in France a percentage of the fines awarded to the

customs authorities is shared with the customs agents who have seized the goods. Thus, they are “encouraged” to seize all the goods they consider to be infringing.

8         GERMANY

8.1         LEGAL FRAMEWORK

Harmonization on an European level is in certain areas of law rather advanced. However, procedural law, to be distinguished from enforcement law, is to a far extent an exception of this. Accordingly, procedural law remains mainly national, not harmonized law.

Whereas the procedural law is harmonized all over Germany, the German states have still the competence for the courts as such. Accordingly, the number of courts and the organization of the courts themselves is in the competence of the states.

8.2         MAIN PRINCIPLES

  1. The German court system has several Court tracks depending on the matter of law in question, such as general civil law, family law, labor law, social law, administrative law, criminal law and constitutional law. In the following, we will briefly elaborate the civil law court system.
  2. Generally, the plaintiff has at least two, and as the case may be max. three instances of court access, starting with the local courts (Amtsgericht) or District Courts (Landgericht) as first instance, the Court of Appeals (Oberlandesgericht; OLG) as the second instance and in certain cases and if allowed by the Court of Appeals or allowed by the Federal Supreme Court a third instance (Revision) at the Federal Supreme Court.  In practice, only a small percentage of cases reach the Federal Supreme Court (Bundesgerichtshof; BGH).

A further special court is the German Constitutional court (Bundesverfassungsgericht, BverfG) in Karlsruhe which is not a regular last instance, but at the end the court with the highest competence in

view of its findings on the most fundamental set of law, the German constitution (Grundgesetz). In very rare cases, the plaintiff can, after having exploited  all instances, file a complaint with the Constitutional Court claiming violation of his constitutional rights.

  1. Generally, it is not necessary to send a warning letter before you go to court. However, it is in most cases useful to send such letter to avoid to bear the costs for filing a complaint or a request for a preliminary injunction if the defendant immediately declares it will not contest the action after being notified about the court action. Also, in preliminary injunction proceedings, judges are interested in the reaction of the defendant, in particular if they intend to decide ex parte.
  2. At the local courts, only one judge is deciding the case, whereas the chambers in the District courts and the Court of Appeals have usually three judges and the chambers of the Federal Supreme Court even five judges.

The plaintiff can file its court action, and the defendant can later on request that, either to a civil law chamber comprising three professional judges (at the District Court level) in cases of unfair competition, design and trademark law also to a commercial chamber comprising one professional judge and two non-professional side judges being from the local industry.

  1. German lawyers can represent their clients in all German courts with the exception of the Federal Supreme Court to which only a handful of lawyers resident in Karlsruhe are admitted.
  2. Whereas the first instance, in IT or IP matters usually the District Court, considers both the facts and the law completely, the Court of Appeal, in many cases, only considers whether the first instance has evaluated the facts and the law correctly. Accordingly, new facts can only be submitted in the 2nd instance in certain circumstances. This is the reason why it is so important to prepare the first instance case very carefully.
  3. Whereas you have always jurisdiction at the residence of the defendant, you have in particular in IP cases also jurisdiction at the place of infringement which is often the case everywhere in Germany, for example because a trademark is used all over Germany or a website is intended to be downloaded all over Germany. In those cases, plaintiff can choose the court to file its court action.
  4. Whereas IT cases have no special courts, there are special courts

with exclusive jurisdiction for certain IP matters, such as a German trademarks and designations, community trademarks, designs and patents in every German state. This reduces, in IP matters, usually the choice of jurisdiction, but provides the benefit of specialized judges with sometimes long experience. In IP matters, the courts of Hamburg, Cologne, Mannheim, Düsseldorf and Munich are in particular known for their expertise.

  1. Whereas a first instance trial usually last between 10 months and two years, the proceedings at the Court of Appeals level last usually longer, on average two years. The current duration of Federal Supreme Court proceedings is about 2 to 5 years.

8.3         IMPORTANT MILESTONES OF A TRIAL

8.3.1        First instance procedure

After filing the complaint and having advanced the expected court fees based on a calculation of the litigation value, the complaint is served to the defendant who has usually 14 days to declare its willingness to defend himself. Then a court hearing to discuss an amicable settlement and/or to litigate the case is scheduled by the court. Before that, the defendant has the opportunity to file a response to the complaint. Usually, the parties can exchange further briefs until the hearing. In the hearing, the court tries to settle the case, often by announcing his preliminary view on the merits. At the end of the hearing in which usually all facts and evidence must be presented or offered, the court

will render or announce a decision which can be a final decision for this instance, but also its decision to hear witnesses or order an expert opinion on certain facts or even the law.

8.3.2        Judgment and further Appeals

If a judgment is rendered and, sometimes only weeks and even months later, substantiated, the losing party can within one month file an appeal which must be substantiated within two months starting from the receipt of the full decision. Electronic submission of both complaints, briefs and the decision is not yet available at all courts.

8.3.3        Revision

If a party wants to further appeal a decision of a Court of Appeals, it must ask the Court of Appeals to allow the revision to the Federal Supreme Court. Such revision will mainly be allowed if there is a new question of law at stake. If such revision is not allowed by the Court of Appeals, the respective party can file a complaint against this non-admission to the Federal Supreme Court itself which will then in its own discretion allow the revision or not.

8.4         THE PRELIMINARY RULING QUESTION BEFORE THE EUROPEAN COURT OF JUSTICE

Every judge in any national court proceeding can forward certain questions of European law which he considers as decisive for deciding the case to the European Court of Justice. As long as the ECJ has not decided about it, the proceedings are stayed.

8.5         COSTS AND FEES

The losing party must pay the court fees and the reimbursable statutory lawyers’ fees, also only to a certain extent, if both parties lose and win to a certain extent. Both the court and the lawyers statutory fees are calculated on the basis of the litigation value of the case. This can be the sum of claimed damages, in IP matters more often the value of an injunction or information claim. Each party may in addition pay the difference of higher lawyers’ fees, often calculated on a time basis, exceeding the statutory lawyer´s fees.

8.6         PRELIMINARY INJUNCTION PROCEEDINGS

Preliminary injunction proceedings are in particular in the field of intellectual property law a sharp sword in Germany. They are often the only court proceedings conducted. In such proceedings, you can mainly claim an injunction, but no damages. In IP matters, you must, with most courts, file the request for a preliminary injunction within one month of your knowledge of the infringement and the infringer. Only a few courts allow the filing of a preliminary injunction also for a somewhat longer period. You must substantiate the facts by documents or affidavits within this timeframe. Courts can then decide,

even ex parte, very quickly, often on the same or the next day. If such a decision is then served to the defendant by the plaintiff with the help of an officer within one month, the defendant must immediately stop his infringing conduct and can, of course, oppose the injunction. The court will then schedule quickly a hearing to consider the arguments of the defendant. If such an injunction should then be lifted, the defendant has a claim for compensation for his loss by following the injunction decision.

8.7         CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS

Criminal proceedings are governed by different rules then described above and handled by special courts and usually specialized criminal law lawyers.

Criminal proceedings are usually commenced by the public prosecutor following the investigating work of the police and other authorities. The court must then allow the complaint which will then be prosecuted against the defendant. Although certain criminal sanctions are also available in commercial matters, there are rarely enforced in German practice in these areas of law.

9         HUNGARY

9.1         LEGAL FRAMEWORK

Though the field of criminal and civil law procedures are not fully harmonized within the European Union, the Hungarian legal system shows considerable similarities with German and Austrian systems because of historical reasons.

9.2         MAIN PRINCIPLES

The main principles of civil procedures can be summarized as the following:

  1. Civil Law procedure is currently governed by Act III of 1952 on Civil Procedures (hereinafter Code on Civil Procedures, CCP)[16] . In Hungary the civil court system has four tiers. The local courts are the first instance courts in minor cases. In certain cases the county courts (in Hungarian: Törvényszék) proceed on the first instance, furthermore they also handle appeals filed against the decisions of local courts. The five Courts of Appeals (in Hungarian: Ítélőtábla) handle the appeals filed against the decisions of the county courts. The highest instance of judicial forum is the Supreme Court (in Hungarian: Kúria).
  2. Hungarian courts are legally not bound by previous judgments nevertheless the Supreme Court and the courts of appeals publish their judgments to provide guidance for lower courts. Moreover the Supreme Court has a constitutional duty to harmonise the administration of justice within the Hungarian judiciary mainly by means of rendering uniformity decisions.
  3. Before commencing a civil procedure sending a cease and desist letter is obligatory in all legal disputes between business entities. In cases inter alia where at least one of the parties is a private person, moreover, if a request for a preliminary injunction had been filed, no prior cease and desist letter is required. A request for preliminary injunction is therefore
  4. useful for the surprise factor. Regardless of the requirements, it is common in Hungary to send a cease and desist letter to the adverse party in order to open a dialogue.
  5. For cases of urgency, the CCP offers right holders expedited proceedings in order to seek immediate legal protection. Preliminary injunction claims are adjudged within approximately 4-6 weeks in the first instance and are immediately executable. Second instance decisions on preliminary injunctions are usually taken within 3-5 months after the appeal has been filed. Upon a request for a preliminary injunction the court may order interim measures against the infringing party. The core idea behind the institution of preliminary injunction is to ensure a quick but interim remedy prior to the final decision on the merits of the case. The court, upon request, may implement preliminary injunction ordering compliance with the claim (counterclaim), or compliance with the application requesting preliminary injunction, where this is deemed necessary (1) to prevent any imminent threat of damage, or (2) to preserve the status quo giving rise to the dispute, or (3) if it is necessary taking into consideration the special protection of the applicant’s rights, where the advantages attainable by the injunction exceed the disadvantage caused by the injunction. The court may order preliminary injunction subject to the provision of security. The facts underlying the necessity of the preliminary injunction shall be substantiated.’
  6. Under certain limited circumstances e.g. in case of extreme urgency, the court may grant interim measures ex parte.
  7. As a basic rule the parties shall justify that the court is territorially competent and has jurisdiction to adjudge the case. In some cases certain courts has exclusive jurisdiction (e.g. in industrial property cases the Metropolitan Court has an exclusive jurisdiction), in other cases (e.g. in copyright cases) the generally competent County Court has jurisdiction.

9.3         IMPORTANT MILESTONES OF A TRIAL

9.3.1        First instance procedure

Civil proceedings commence when the plaintiff submits its statement of claim to the competent court. The court must examine the case within 30 days from receipt, if the claim complies with the procedural requirements, the court schedules a hearing and delivers the statement of claim to the defendant.

The defendant must put forward the defense statement on the first oral hearing, at latest, however, in general the statement of defense is filed in writing. The parties are allowed to file further observations, responses, etc. as far as time allows, the number of submissions is not limited. Late submissions may be disregarded by the court.

Unless the law provides otherwise, the burden of proof lies with the party in the interest of which it is that the court accepts the alleged fact as true. Generally speaking, all types of evidence are admissible (witness testimony, expert opinion etc.), but in most cases evidence is presented to the court in the form of written documents.

9.3.2        Judgment

In simple cases the judgment is issued on the first oral hearing, in more complicated matters, especially if witnesses must be heard, more than one oral hearing may be necessary.

There are cases where the defendant takes no measure whatsoever to defend his case. In cases where the defendant fails to appear at the first hearing and has not presented his defence in writing, the court can, at the plaintiff’s request, issue a court order against the defendant in which all remedies shall be ordered by the court as requested by the plaintiff. The court will also order the defendant to pay the costs.

9.3.3        The Appeal

An appeal lies against the first instance judgment which is to be filed within 15 days following the delivery of the written judgment. As a general rule, new evidence and new facts may be presented only if the party submitting the appeal becomes aware such facts or evidence after the issuance of the first instance decision.

9.3.4        Revision (Supreme Court)

A request for revision can be filed with the Supreme Court (called Kúria) on points of law within 60 days after the second instance judgment has been delivered in writing. New evidence or facts are disregarded by the Supreme Court.

9.4         THE PRELIMINARY RULING QUESTION BEFORE THE EUROPEAN COURT

When a judge in a national court has doubts in connection with the interpretation of community law (e.g. in IP cases) the judge has opportunity to pose questions to the Court of Justice of the European Union. Simultaneously with requesting the preliminary opinion the court stays the proceeding. In its request, the court defines the matter for which the preliminary opinion is required, and outlines the facts, to the extent required, and the pertinent passages of the Hungarian legal system. After receiving the preliminary ruling, the Hungarian court continues the proceeding and adjudges the case on the basis of the interpretation of the European Court.

9.5         PROCEDURAL COSTS

On the basis of CCP the losing party pays all the costs of the winning party (losing party pays principle). However, the court can order the payment of only a part of the costs, where the winning party caused some of the costs, or the costs are exorbitant, inequitable or unjustified.

As for the official costs, the official duty is 6 % of the damages claimed, if no damages are claimed, the official duty is 36000 HUF, app. 120 EUR) in the first instance. The official duty is 8% of the damages claimed in appeal (48000 HUF, app. 160 EUR if no damages claimed) and 10% of the damages claimed in revision proceedings (70000 HUF, app. 230 EUR if no damages claimed). Attorney’s fees can vary depending on the complexity of the actual case and the activity of the parties.

9.6         CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS

The criminal procedure is governed by different rules. A detailed presentation of Hungarian criminal procedure would exceed the framework of this study, however, the main characteristics criminal lawsuits can be summed up as follows.

  • Criminal proceedings commence with the investigation. The investigating authorities (Police, National Tax and Customs Office) conduct the investigation independently or upon the order of the prosecutor, therefore in most cases the complainant has no control over the criminal procedure. The task of investigating authorities include the exploration of the crime and the perpetrator, furthermore tracing and securing evidence.
  • If the evidence collected during the investigation confirms the guilt of the defendant without any doubt, the prosecutor files an indictment and represents the charge before the court.
  • The court may proceed only upon an indictment: the court may only establish the criminal liability of the person against whom the accusatory instrument was filed, and may only consider acts contained in the instrument.

10    ITALY

10.1    LEGAL FRAMEWORK

The Italian legal system has a structure similar to all countries of civil law because of historical reasons.

Ordinary jurisdiction is divided into two sectors: (i) Criminal, to prosecute person who commits a crime, and (ii) Civil, to ensure  legal protection of the rights concerning the relations between individuals or between  the individuals and a Public Administration in the exercise of its  duties, when Public Administration harms the individual right of a person.

The reform of the Court districts, made by Legislative Decree 155/2012 in force from 14 September 2013, has been necessary to define appropriate method of treatment for  the data managed by computer systems in use in the civil registries of the courts. The object of such regulatory intervention was to review and amend the constituencies of judicial offices, making a significant revision of the judicial geography.

The reform of the judicial geography has resulted in:

  • deletion and incorporation of all the 220 sub-offices in the main offices  of the Courts ;
  • deletion and incorporation of 31 Courts and  corresponding public prosecutors.

10.2    MAIN PRINCIPLES

The main principles of civil procedures can be summarized as the following:

  1. Civil proceedings are governed by the Civil Procedure Code which provides for a system with four types of courts. The Justices of the Peace are appointed to assess the causes minor according a dual criterion of value and of matters. The jurisdiction for cases of greater magnitude is entrusted to the Courts, which are also judges of second instance for cases before the Justice of the Peace. Depending on the subject matter, the Courts are composed of a single judge or a panel of three members. Since 2003 specialized sections of Intellectual Property have been set up. These sections have changed their name following the entry into force of Decree Law no. 1/2012 transforming themselves in the Courts of Companies. The Courts of Appeal, which are judge of second instance for decisions of the Courts. The highest instance of judicial forum is the Supreme Court of Cassation, which is the judge of final instance for questions of law.
  2. The sources of law in Italy in the field of Industrial Property are represented by the Civil Code and the Code of Industrial Property. The second has been lastly modified by Law no. 194 of 2015.
  3. For cases of urgency, the Industrial Property Code provides that, for reasons of urgency, it is possible to obtain immediate legal protection. It states that whoever has a  good reason to fear that during the time necessary  to enforce its duty  in the ordinary way, this is threatened by an imminent and irreparable prejudice,  may request to the court for the application of the  interim measure, which appears under the circumstances, the most appropriate to ensure the temporary effects of the final decision on the merits. The precautionary protection is possible in the following types of actions: the technical appraisal for purposes of reconciliation (planned and disciplined by art. 696 bis of the Civil Procedure Code), the description and seizure, the injunction and the temporary transfer of the domain name. If the judge in issuing the interim measure doesn’t specify the period within the parties must begin the ordinary proceeding, it must be started within twenty working days or thirty-one calendar days, whichever is longer. The period starts from the delivery of the order if it occurred at the hearing or otherwise, from its communication by chancellor to the parties. If the trial proceeding is not begun within the peremptory period above, or if after its inception is extinguished, the interim measure loses its effectiveness.
  4. The foregoing provisions shall not apply to interim protection required under Article 700 of the Civil Procedure Code, because this type of precautionary measure retains its effectiveness even if it is not started in the ordinary trial.
  5. Each Court of Companies is located in the capital town of any region of Italy. The only two regions with the presence of two Courts of Companies are Lombardy, where one is in Milan and the other in Brescia, and Sicily, where one is in Palermo and the other in Catania.

10.3    IMPORTANT MILESTONES OF A TRIAL

10.3.1    First Instance Procedure

The civil trial  begins when the plaintiff through his attorney, notifies the writ of summons to the counterpart and, within ten days of notification, register the Case to the role of the Court. The first  hearing is fixed by the plaintiff not before  ninety days from the date of notification of the writ of summons. The defendant must put forward his  written defence statement on the first oral hearing or within twenty days before, if he wants to raise exceptions which are not detectable by Judge. At the oral hearing  , if the parties ask for it  and where appropriate, the judge may grant additional time for the filing of further pleadings and inquiries. The terms and the content of those statements are governed by Article 183 of the Civil Procedure Code. These pleadings  may contain specifications of  defenses illustrated in  introductory acts of the trial  (but cannot contain  modifications of initial applications or extensions of the questions raised), attach documentary evidence, request the admission of oral evidence and technical advice by an expert in the field. It is important to point out   Article 115 of   Civil Procedure Code provides that a  non-specific objection of the facts stated by the counterpart, constitutes an implicit admission of those facts in favor of  the opposing party, evaluated by the  judge as argument to decide the case.   Requests for oral and technical advice are examined by the judge at the second hearing.

10.3.2    Judgment

When the parties are not asking for the time-limits for pleadings  at the first  hearing, or when the believe that the case is already ripe for decision, the judge may order  a specific  hearing to keep oral discussion of the case. This type of discussion, without written pleadings subsequent to the initial ones, is governed by Article 281 of the Civil Procedure Code. At this hearing, the case is discussed orally by lawyers of the parties. The judge, at the end of the discussion, verbally pronounces the Judgment. Otherwise, when it is necessary to listen to  witnesses, the judge, at the second  hearing, decides how many witnesses to hear and about what issues;  then  he sets the hearing to listen  to them. The judge may also decide to have a technical advice, also if it’s not  requested by  one of the parties. After the acquisition of evidences the judge sets  another hearing, where parties  specify their final conclusions  and he  assigns  terms to the parties to deposit the final statements and rejoinders, which are a summary in fact and in law of the case. Upon expiry of such terms the case is decided by Judgment filed in Chancery and communicated to the parties.

10.3.3    The Appeal

The Appeal is a review of the judgment of first instance  with reference to the facts and points of law. The Parties must specifically appeal every single part of the Judgment because each part which is  not appealed becomes definitive. Except in special cases,  parties cannot  present in  Appeal new circumstances or new evidences. The deadline for appeal is 6 months from the publication of the court decision or 30 days from its  notification  made by the counterpart. The period from August 1st to August 31th doesn’t count.

10.3.4    Revision (Supreme Court)

In Italy, the Supreme Court is responsible for the revision of an appeal judgment, but only for questions of law. The procedure can be activated within 60 days from receipt of notification of the Appeal judgment by the counterpart, or within  six month  from its publication. New facts or evidence are never admitted.

10.4    THE PRELIMINARY RULING QUESTION BEFORE THE EUROPEAN COURT

This procedure is open to the national courts of the EU Member States , that may apply to the European Court asking for interpretation or validity of European law in the context of a pending case. Unlike other proceedings in front of European Court  the reference is not an action against an European or national act, but a question on the application of European law in a specific national case. The preliminary ruling question thus promotes active cooperation between national judges and the Court of Justice in order to obtain uniform application of EU law.

Any Italian judge seised of a dispute where the application of a provision of European law raises questions (main proceedings), may decide to apply to the Court of Justice to resolve them before deciding the case. There are two types of preliminary ruling question:

  1. the reference for the interpretation of European standard: the national court asks the Court of Justice to issue an opinion on the interpretation of European law in order to apply the rule correctly;
  2. the reference for examining the validity of the European standard: the national court asks the Court of Justice to verify the validity about an act of European law.

During the time necessary to obtain the Court of Justice decision the national proceeding is suspended. After that decision the Italian judge continues the proceeding and judges the case according to the interpretation of the European Court.

10.5    PROCEDURAL COSTS

The party who  starts a lawsuit or proposes a counter-claim or sues a third party in the proceeding must pay to the State a fee, proportional to the amount of the claim, the type and the degree of proceeding, from €  43,00 to €  6.744,00.

Moreover, the party bringing an appeal is required by the court to pay the same amount if the appeal is rejected in its entirety or is declared unacceptable for any reason.

On the basis of Civil Procedure Code, the party who loses the case pays trial costs (state fee above and lawyer’s fees) in favor of the party who wins.

In Italy lawyers’ fees  are defined by a set of parameters contained in the Ministerial Decree 55/2014. The main parameter is the value of the case but there are some additional criteria, including the complexity and the urgency of the work provided.

10.6    CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS

The prosecutor is the Magistrate who prosecutes. The prosecutor evaluates the merits of each  news of crime and  fulfills the necessary investigations to decide whether it is necessary to ask for a trial or not. This principle does not absolutely require that the prosecutor must necessarily ask for a trialfor a person suspected of a crime;  his institutional obligation is to make sure that the law is respected. Therefore, the prosecutor asks to archive the claim if the collected items are not suitable to support the accusation in court; but later  he can  carry out new investigations and then ask the judge to reopen the case. The mandatory prosecution must ensure two basic principles:

  • if the victim doesn’t have economic possibilities, this should not prevent the offender being prosecuted;
  • only a rule of law must determinate who shall be punished and who shall  go free from punishment,  it cannot  depend on a choice of political expediency.

As the civil justice even the criminal one has three levels of courts: the first two regarding merit, the last (Supreme Court of Cassation) for legitimacy.

11    NORWAY

11.1    NORWAY, EEA AND EU

Norway is not a member of the European Union (EU). However, Norway is a member of the European Economic Area (EEA). EEA comprises three of four member states of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) (Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway) and 27 of 28 member states of the European Union (EU).

The EEA allows the EFTA states to participate in the EU’s Internal Market without being members of the EU. Due to EEA, the EFTA states adopt almost all EU legislation related to the single market, except laws on agriculture and fisheries. However, they also contribute to and influence the formation of new EEA relevant policies and legislation at an early stage as part of a formal decision-shaping process.

11.2    GENERAL

11.2.1    Introduction

National legal procedures are only harmonized to a limited extent within the EEA. Each country is relatively free to set the rules for procedures conducted before its national courts. However, states must act in accordance with the general and overarching principles, in particular drawn from the European Convention on Human Rights.

The civil procedure in Norway can be summarized as follows:

  • The Dispute Act. Civil Law procedure in Norway is governed by the Act relating to mediation and procedure in civil disputes (the Dispute Act). The Dispute Act is based on the fundamental process principles of the European Convention on Human Rights Article 6.
  • Intellectual property rights. The Dispute Act was amended in 2013 to improve the enforcement of intellectual property rights(IPR). The amendment aims to make it easier to reveal IPR infringements by (upon due cause) granting the right holder a right to information regarding origin and distribution network of infringing goods and services.

A request for information may also be directed to others than the infringer, hereunder those who have been dealing with goods or services that constitute an infringement. A request for information may also be made in connection with ongoing litigation or preparation for such.

In short, there is now a quite far-reaching obligation of disclosure whether a case is before the courts or not.

11.2.2    Legal profession – the lawyer

Entry to the legal profession is exclusively through university education. Law studies usually take five years and result in a master degree in law.

A law graduate must have a license to practice after finishing Norwegian law school, which is usually obtained by working in a law firm for a period of at least two years. Graduates are required to litigate three civil cases before a national court before a license will be issued.

A licensed practicing jurist in Norway is called an ”advokat”. An ”advokat” may render advice to clients within all fields of the law and is also allowed to appear before all Norwegian courts in the first two instances. However, it requires a special license to appear before the Supreme Court.

There is no distinction in Norway between practicing lawyers similar to the distinction between barristers and solicitors in some common law countries.

11.3    THE COURT SYSTEM

11.3.1    Introduction

There are in Norway three regular court instances, plus a “zero” level Conciliation Boards, for smaller disputes.

11.3.2    The Conciliation Boards (level “zero”)

The aim of the Conciliation Board is to reach a settlement between the parties.

In each of Norway’s 430 municipalities, there is a Conciliation Board consisting of lay conciliators.

Conciliation Boards handle a large volume of cases, mostly debt claims, and enable many smaller disputes to be resolved in an expeditious and economical manner.

Civil disputes must as a general rule be brought before a Conciliation Board before a summons can be issued in the City or District Court. However, there are a number of important exceptions to this rule, the most practical one being that conciliation proceedings are not necessary when both parties have been assisted by a lawyer and the subject matter of the case has a value in excess of NOK 125.000.

The Conciliation Board is also competent to pass judgment in most types of cases. Judgments of the Conciliation Board may be appealed to the City or District Court.

Please see section a) for further description of the process in the Conciliation Boards.

11.3.3    Court Assisted Mediation

The City or District Court and the Court of Appeal must offer the parties judicial mediation.

If the parties reach an agreement, the settlement may be concluded as an in-court settlement, which is recorded in the judicial mediation record. If the case is not resolved by mediation, it will be heard before the court, with a new judge.

Judicial mediators must maintain confidentiality as to what took place during the judicial mediation. A judge who has acted as judicial mediator in the case may only participate in the further hearing of the case at the request of the parties, and if the judge does not consider it imprudent to do so.

11.3.4    The City or District Courts, the Courts of Appeal and the Supreme Court (level 1)

The City or District Courts are the ordinary courts of first instance (if the case has not been heard by the conciliation board). Norway is divided into 67 legal districts, each with its own city or district court. If the subject matter of the case has a value less than NOK 125,000 (approx. € 15 000), specific rules for small claims procedure will apply.

The City and District Courts also have some administrative functions, such as registration of deaths and the issue of probate and letters of administration, the functions of notary public and civil marriages.

The Courts of Appeal are courts of second instance in civil cases and hear appeals against the decisions of the city and District Courts. If the value of the subject matter of the case does not exceed NOK 125,000, the Court must approve the appeal to be brought before the Court.

The Constitution states that the Supreme Court of Justice shall pronounce judgment in the final instance, and its decisions cannot be appealed. The Supreme Court is situated in Oslo. When in session, the Supreme Court generally sits with five justices, but occasionally, the Supreme Court sits with 11 justices, or more seldom in plenary session with all 19 justices.

Only a minority of cases (12 % in 2013) are admitted to the Supreme Court. The decision to grant admission lies with the Appeals Selection Committee. Admission is usually only given if the case is of principal significance, and can therefore give guidance in other, future, cases.

Juries are not used in civil cases.

11.3.5    Judges

Judges are appointed by the King in Council (Cabinet). The appointments are non-political. Judges are appointed first and foremost on the basis of academic and personal qualifications. Judgeships are open to qualified jurists.

The president of a City or District Court may also appoint deputy judges

for a term of two years. The deputy judges are usually younger jurists with limited experience since graduating from law school. The deputy judges are, however, normally assigned cases in the same manner as ordinary judges, and have the same powers as an ordinary judge in the cases they are assigned to administer.

11.3.6    Evidence

The presentation of evidence at the trial is based on the principle of immediacy, i.e. the evidence must be presented directly to the court in its most original form. The principle of immediacy means that witnesses, as a general rule, must give their testimony in court. The principle of immediacy does not apply to the Supreme Court where the presentation of all evidence is indirect as documentary evidence.

On certain conditions, evidence may be conducted as hearing evidence.

Documents in a foreign language must, as a general rule, be accompanied by an authorised translation into Norwegian. The court may waive this requirement if all concerned understand the foreign language. In practice, documents in the other Scandinavian languages and in English will normally be accepted, whilst the court will usually require that documents in other foreign languages be translated into Norwegian (or English).

11.3.7    Public access

Pleadings during the preparatory stages of trial (the writ of summons, notice of defence, etc. – see section b) below) are not public. However, the hearing itself is, as general rule, open to the public, and anyone has the right to access the documents presented as evidence in the court, after the evidence has been presented.

11.4    IMPORTANT MILESTONES OF A TRIAL

11.4.1    The initiation of the case and the Conciliation Board

Before the plaintiff can file an originating summons to the Conciliation Board or a writ of summons to the District/City Court, the defendant should be notified about the pending claim. This notification is not a pleading. However, the claim and the legal basis for the claim should be presented in writing, with a request for the adversary to consider the claim.

If the plaintiff fails to notify the defendant of the claim, this will not affect the validity of the claim. It may, though, be taken into consideration when it comes to which party shall bear the legal costs of the case, see section 0.

The parties to a civil action must, with certain expectations as described in section 0 above, meet before the Conciliation Board for mediation proceedings.

The plaintiff must present an application for conciliation to the Conciliation Board, identifying the parties to the case, and containing a short statement as to the substance of the case. It is recommended, but not necessary, that the application contains a plea. A plea enables the Conciliation Board to pass judgment in default if the defendant does not appear.

If the dispute is not settled through conciliation proceedings and the Conciliation Board does not rule on the matter, the case will be stopped. The plaintiff then has one year to file a writ of summons with the City or District Court. Any judgment of the Conciliation Board can be appealed to the City or District Court.

11.4.2    Initiation of the case

The first instance procedure is initiated by the writ of summons to the City or District courts.

The writ of summons must state both the facts and the legal basis for the claim, and should contain a list of the evidence the plaintiff intends to present in support of the claim. It must also contain the plaintiff’s plea.

After a writ of summons has been filed, the summons will be served on the defendant. The defendant must file a defence within a given time limit, usually 3 weeks. The failure to file a defence reply may result in judgment being awarded against the defendant on the basis of the

plaintiff’s version of the dispute.

The preparatory proceedings end with a closing submission from both parties; usually two weeks before oral hearings starts.

11.4.3    Main hearing

The main hearing starts with a short (approx. 15 minutes) summary of the case as the judge has understood it. After the summary, the plaintiff and the defendant are asked to present their opening arguments and written evidence, normally through their lawyers. The plaintiff’s side starts.

After the opening arguments, the party representatives from plaintiff and the defendant testify, followed by any other witnesses, all under oath.

After the examination of parties and witnesses is completed, each side will present their closing arguments.

The parties are not obliged to be represented by lawyers at the trial. However, self-representation is rare in commercial civil cases, for good reasons.

11.4.4    Judgment

Apart from applications to amend clerical errors in the judgment, there are no particular post-trial motions in Norwegian civil procedure. Until a judgment is legally enforceable, it may be appealed. If a judgment is legally enforceable, the only alternative is to apply to have the case re-opened, but the conditions to have a case re-opened are very strict.

According to the Dispute Act, the entire procedures before each instance should be completed within 6 months from writ of summons or the appeal was received by the relevant court until a judgment is passed.

11.4.5    Appeal

The judgments of the District Courts may be appealed to the Court of

Appeal, and from there to the Supreme Court. The time limit for appeal is usually one month from the date upon which the judgment was lawfully served.

11.5    PRELIMINARY INJUNCTION

A preliminary injunction is a temporary judgment, where you can secure or accomplish a claim temporary, until final judgment is available.  Preliminary injunctions apply to all claims except for money claims, and are practical not least for securing IPR.

Examples include injunctions against the sale of copied products and distribution of defamatory articles in the media.

11.6    LAWYERS’ FEES AND PROCEDURAL COSTS

Court filing fee applies when filing an application to the Conciliation Board, a writ of summons to the District Court, or an appeal to the Court of Appeal or the Supreme Court. The court fee varies depending on the case and the court’s legal action.

The party who initiates a court case or appeals a court decision must pay the court fee to the court. One base court fee is 860 NOK (approx. €100). The number of court base fees to be paid depends on the case and how comprehensive the case is. One day in the City or District Courts cost for example five base court fees (4300 NOK) and two days cost eight base court fees (6880 NOK).

In addition to the procedural fees, incidental costs may arise in the form of court costs for lay judges, experts and witnesses.

Lawyers’ fees depend on the complexity of the actual case. As a general rule, a lawyer needs three days of preparation per day in the court. For a partner at 2 600 NOK per hour (approx. € 315) two days court, runs at  case may be NOK 156 000 (60 hours x NOK 2600 = NOK 156 000, or approx. € 18 900).

If a party wins the case in all material respects, the court will, as a general rule, order the losing party to cover the winning party’s necessary legal costs. That means you may not have full coverage even if you win completely, if legal cost is seen as too high by the court.

When a case is partly won, partly lost, the general rule is that each party shall bear its own costs.

With the exception of plaintiffs that do not reside in Norway or an EEA country, there is no general rule that a plaintiff must provide security for costs in a civil case. A non-resident or non-EEA plaintiff, however, is obliged to provide security for procedural costs if the defendant so requests, unless exception has been made by way of treaty with the plaintiff’s country of residence.

11.7    CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS

The criminal procedure is governed by separate rules. A detailed presentation of Norwegian criminal procedure would exceed the framework of this overview, however, the main characteristics criminal lawsuits can be summed up as follows:

  • Criminal proceedings commence with the investigation. The investigating authorities (Police, National Tax and Customs Office) conduct the investigation independently of the courts or upon the order of the prosecutor. Therefore, in most cases, the complainant has no control over the criminal procedure. The tasks of investigating authorities include the exploration of the crime and the perpetrator, furthermore tracing and securing evidence.
  • The Prosecutor files an indictment if The Prosecutor, based on the investigation, is convinced about the guilt of the defendant and that he is able to prove this before the court.
  • The court may proceed only upon an indictment: the court may only establish the criminal liability of the person against whom the accusatory instrument was filed, and may only consider acts contained in the instrument.
  • The procedure is not inquisitorial.

12    POLAND

12.1    LEGAL FRAMEWORK

Pursuant to the general rule, both substantive and procedural law have to be consistent with European legislation, and therefore are subject to harmonization within European Union. Although this process is advanced, the procedural law is slightly influenced by European law. As a result, Polish judicial procedure is governed mainly by the national legislation.

12.2    MAIN PRINCIPLES

  1. In Poland the court system is divided into two sections, comprising of common courts and administrative courts. Depending on the case in issue, proceedings concerning IP matters can take place in both types of courts. Administrative courts handle cases concerning the appeals against the Polish Patent Office (the) PTO decisions, granting rights such as trademarks or patents from the point of view of their validity, whereas the question of the infringement of the exclusive IP rights fall within the jurisdiction of common courts. For the purpose of this publication, we will focus on the procedure before common courts.
  2. Civil common courts operate under the regulations of the Code of Civil Procedure. Taking into consideration stages of the proceedings, we can name three types of common courts: District Court (Sąd Rejonowy), Regional Court (Sąd Okręgowy) and Court of Appeals (Sąd Apelacyjny). In general, plaintiff is entitled to two instances of case revision. Depending on the matter, the two instance path may start in the District Court as first instance and Regional Court as second instance, or Regional Court and Court of Appeals respectively. Rules upon which each case is attributed to the materially competent court are established exclusively by the legislator. If certain requirements are fulfilled, after two instance proceedings the party can also present the case to the Supreme Court (Sąd Najwyższy), which, even though is not formally treated as the third instance, can change the overall outcome due to purely legal (not factual) reasons.
  3. IP litigations, due to their complexity and general business significance, are handled by Regional Courts in the first instance and can be revised in the Court of Appeals.
  4. First instance cases are judged by one judge. However, if the case is particularly complicated, the President of the Court may appoint larger representation, namely three judges. In practice, it does not happen. In the second instance, case is always ruled by three judges.
  5. The plaintiff should present his case before a court having its jurisdiction over the seat of the defendant. However in the “tortious type” cases plaintiff can also file a claim before a court competent for the venue where the infringement occurred. This rule may be particularly difficult to apply due to modern technologies blocking the possibility to determine the exactly location of infringement, in particular if plaintiff’s rights were threatened via the Internet. In order to ensure greater protection of injured parties, in all cases for tort, plaintiffs are deemed to have the right to file a case at any court convenient.

In Poland, the Court of Community Trademarks and Community Designs in Warsaw was granted with the special authority for handling the IP infringements. This resolution is highly beneficial, as it provides plaintiff and defendant with well-qualified judges experienced not only in procedure and general law, but in particular in the field of intellectual property.

  1. In the IP litigations a client can be represented by an advocate, by a legal counsel or by a patent attorney, there is no additional requirement to obtain professional qualifications specifically for IP matters.
  2. The duration of the trial depends on many factors, such as scope of brief of evidence and appearance of the parties when such appearance is compulsory. Therefore, even the approximate duration of the proceedings is difficult to foresee and estimate.

12.3    IMPORTANT MILESTONES OF A TRIAL

12.3.1    First instance procedure

The first instance proceedings are initiated by filing a statement of claim. Before entering into dispute, the statement of claim is subject to the formal examination by the court. Judge verifies whether all the formal requirements, including court fee payment, are fulfilled. If the statement of claim is correct in terms of formalities, it is served to the defendant, who is granted the right to file a response within certain deadline set forth by the judge. Both parties are obliged to provide the court with full evidence of which they are aware at this stage. This rule is quite vital, as it is possible that documents and any other evidence provided to the court after entering into dispute may be considered delayed and therefore not admissible.

Upon exchange of the statements of the parties, the judge sets the date of the hearing. During the hearing parties are allowed to present their statements and judge examines the evidence. If any of witnesses are summoned to the hearing, they are publicly interrogated. Usually in cases where witnesses or experts appointed by the parties or the court are being examined, there are several hearings before the verdict is announced by the judge.

From the practical point of view, as IP litigations are mostly complicated and usually followed by massive brief of evidence, the verdict is rarely rendered after one hearing.

If none of the parties files an appeal, the judgment is legally valid after 21 days from its rendition and announcement.

12.3.2    Judgment and further appeals

After the rendition of a judgment, the party unsatisfied with the outcome may challenge the verdict before the Court of Appeals. The party should file a motion for written justification of the verdict, which is possible within seven days from its announcement.  The appeal may only be filed within two weeks from the delivery of the verdict with written justification, and this term cannot be extended.

The appeal is filed to the court which issued a verdict, which examines the appeal from the formal point of view, and if there are no formal obstacles, the court passes the appeal together with the files to the Court of Appeals.

Then, the Court of Appeals examines the case once more, but only to the extent indicated in the appeal. That is why it is extremely important to precisely point out the charges against the challenged verdict, as any charges other than indicated would not be revised.

The Court of Appeals may sustain the previous verdict, change it or decide on its invalidation and transfer the case back to the Regional Court for reconsideration.

12.3.3    Revision

The Appeal Court’s decision is final, however the party unsatisfied with the Appeal Court verdict can still try to challenge it before the Supreme Court. However, there are additional prerequisites that have to be satisfied. The party is authorized to this extraordinary complaint if the value of the object of litigation is at least equal to 50.000 PLN.

The procedure is quite similar to filing the appeal. The extraordinary complaint has to be filed within two months from the delivery of the verdict with written justification. The formal examination belongs to the Court of Appeals, which – if the complaint is correct – transfers it to the Supreme Court with appropriate files.

It has to be clearly stated though that the Supreme Court is not a third instance court. The Supreme Court does not consider facts and will focus purely on legal aspects. Even if all formal requirements are satisfied, the court may still not take the case into consideration, it depends on further circumstances, such as the importance of the matter or the obvious incorrectness of the challenged judgment of the Court of the Appeal.

12.4    THE PRELIMINARY RULING BEFORE THE EU COURT OF JUSTICE

Pursuant to European regulations, every judge deciding on the case can file a question to the European Court of Justice if answer is considered vital for the outcome of the conducted proceedings. In such case, the litigation remains pending, but stayed until the European Court of Justice resolves the presented matter and answers the question.

12.5    COSTS AND FEES

The obligation to reimburse the costs of the trial and statutory legal fees suffered by the other party lies on the party that loses the trial. When it comes to IP cases, those costs might be considerably high.

12.6    PRELIMINARY INJUNCTION PROCEEDINGS

Each party, especially the injured party whose rights have been infringed can file a motion for interim protection. This action can be taken before or during the trial. Court would grant protection if the party substantiates both: its claim and its legal interest in being granted the protection. The aforementioned legal interest occurs when lack of protection makes it impossible or seriously difficult to execute the future verdict or to acquire the purpose of the proceedings.

The Court may protect the claim in any way that is appropriate and essential. With regard to the IP matters, courts usually order the defendant to cease and desist from the actions considered infringement for the time of the proceedings. This is a powerful tool in the hands of the plaintiff, however on the other hand, if the final verdict issued in this case proves the plaintiff wrong, the plaintiff will be fully responsible for the damages resulting from the preliminary injunction granted on its request.

12.7    CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS

Criminal proceedings are subject to different rules and regulations than the aforementioned civil procedure. Mainly, criminal procedure is governed by the Code of Criminal Procedure and conducted by public authorities acting ex officio.

Pursuant to Polish regulations, entering to the market goods with counterfeited registered trademarks or imitating exclusive industrial designs is an offence prosecuted upon the motion from the authorized party. This means that the initiative to start the proceedings belongs to the entity which suffered due to this offence. However, if the motion for prosecution is filed with the appropriate Prosecutor’s Office, public authorities conduct the investigation on their own.

Criminal proceedings concerning IP protection are increasingly popular nowadays, mainly due to the opportunity to gain the information on the source of the initial infringer.

13    SERBIA

13.1    LEGAL FRAMEWORK

Serbian procedural jurisprudence is divided into the Law on Civil Procedure [17] and the Law on Criminal Procedure [18] that create the general frame for court proceedings.  Certain specific procedural aspects of IP litigation are governed by Laws that regulate particular IP rights.  Serbian courts are further governed by the Law on Organization of Courts[19]  and the Law on Seats and Areas of Competence of Courts[20] .  Serbia is not yet a member of the European Union, and therefore, EU laws and regulations are not applicable in this jurisdiction. Nevertheless, Serbia actively harmonize its laws with EU legal system.

13.2    MAIN PRINCIPLES

The main principles of civil procedure can be summarized as follows:

  1. Civil procedure is, in general, governed by the Law on Civil Procedure. Since 2014, all IP litigation cases are subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of only two first-instance courts – The Higher Court in Belgrade and the Commercial Court in Belgrade. These two courts are exclusively entitled to resolve first-instance IP disputes for the whole territory of the Republic of Serbia. The Higher Court is a court of first instance for disputes between natural persons, and decisions of second instance are made by the Court of Appeal. In disputes between legal entities and entrepreneurs, the Court of Commerce is the first-instance court, and the Commercial Court of Appeal has second-instance jurisdiction. The Supreme Cassation Court handles extraordinary legal remedies against the decisions of all courts in the Republic of Serbia and resolves other issues prescribed by law.
  2. Serbian courts are not legally bound by previous judgments. Nevertheless, the Supreme Cassation Court, as well as the courts of appeals publish their opinions to provide guidance for lower courts. Moreover, the Supreme Cassation Court has a duty to harmonize the administration of justice within the Serbian judiciary system, mainly by means of rendering uniformity of decisions.
  3. Before commencing a civil action, sending a cease and desist letter (hereinafter: C&D Letter) is not an obligatory step, but it is recommendable in all legal disputes, both between business entities and natural persons. Sending such a letter would show an effort of the right holder to open a dialogue and its dedication to resolve the dispute amicably. Moreover, it is not a rare situation (especially in IP infringement cases) that the adverse party is willing to comply with the demands from the C&D Letter in order to avoid expensive and time-consuming litigation which would likely result in an unfavorable outcome.
  4. The official language of the proceedings is Serbian with certain exceptions in respect to the languages of national minorities. In the event that a party does not speak Serbian or where the documents and evidences are presented in languages different from Serbian, the assistance of the Court appointed translators is obligatory.

13.3    IMPORTANT MILESTONES OF A TRIAL

13.3.1    First instance procedure and judgment

The trial must be initiated before the competent courts of first instance. A case is initially introduced when the plaintiff submits the written complaint to the competent court, while the dispute formally exists from the moment when the complaint is delivered to the defendant. The parties may represent themselves or may be represented by an Attorney at Law (there are also several additional exceptions related to representation that are not in the scope of this article).

As soon as the complaint is received, the Court will perform a formal examination of the same, which means that the Court checks whether all obligatory requirements are fulfilled. If a complaint submitted by an Attorney at Law contains formal deficiencies, it will be immediately rejected. On the other hand, if the complaint is submitted by a pro se plaintiff, the Court will allow correction of deficiencies, within a certain deadline.

Fifteen days upon receiving the complaint, the Court will deliver the same to the defendant for a response which must be submitted within 30 days of receipt of the complaint.

Afterwards, the Court will schedule a preliminary hearing. It is an obligatory step of the proceedings, which can be excluded only in certain events, as defined by law. At the preliminary hearing, both parties are invited to state all the necessary facts, to propose evidence, to state an opinion about the allegations of the adverse party and to suggest a time frame for the duration of the proceedings. The law is rather strict about presenting the evidence after the preliminary hearing is concluded, and late presentation of the same will be allowed only when exceptional reasons exist (e.g. the party was not aware of the existence of evidence at the moment when the preliminary hearing was held). Upon the conclusion of the preliminary hearing, the Court will define the time frame of the proceedings and schedule the main hearing.

The main hearing represents the main stage of the proceedings in which the merits of the dispute are discussed. Although intended to be held as one hearing, in practice it is commonly divided into several hearings. At the main hearing, all evidence accepted by the Court in the preliminary hearing will be presented. Additionally, the parties will present their arguments in order to enable the Court to make a conclusion as the base for the decision.

Regarding the evidence, many various types are admissible (witness testimony, expert opinion etc.), but in most cases the evidence is presented to the Court in the form of written documents. Unless the law provides otherwise, the burden of proof lies with the party which claims the existence of fact necessary for the establishing and/or enforcing of certain right.

When the Court considers that the legal matter has been thoroughly discussed and clarified, so that the decision can be rendered, it will close the main hearing. Upon the closure of the main hearing, the Court will render the judgment. Besides ruling on the merits of the case, the Court will also decide which party will bear the costs of the proceedings.

13.3.2    The Appeal

First instance judgments can always be appealed by submitting the written appeal within 15 days following the date of delivery of the written judgment. As a general rule, new evidence and new facts may be presented only if the party submitting the appeal becomes aware of such facts or evidence after the conclusion of the main hearing in the first instance proceedings. The judgment may be appealed in respect of both procedural and substantive omissions and errors in the first-instance proceedings.

13.3.3    Revision (Supreme Cassation Court)

A request for revision can be filed with the Supreme Cassation Court (through the Court who issued the first-instance judgment) within 30 days after the judgment has been delivered to the party. The revision can be filed due to both procedural and material omissions in the proceedings. However, the list of particular omissions which might be a base for revision is narrower than the reasons for appeal.

In civil proceedings related to the protection of IP rights, revision is always allowed.

The revision must be filed by an Attorney at Law, or otherwise the same will be rejected. Likewise, the party must be represented by an Attorney at Law during the entire revision proceedings. This is one of the few exceptions when a party cannot represent itself before judicial authorities.

13.4    PROCEDURAL COSTS

The costs of the proceedings are, in principle, imposed on the losing party by the Court. However, the Court can waive the costs, if the party has no resources or its financial situation cannot endure such costs (upon the party’s request). Also, the Court can order the payment of only a part of the costs, in situations where the winning party caused some of the costs, or the costs are inequitable or unjustified. Finally, in situations where the party has partially succeeded in the proceedings, the Court has the liberty to decide that each party can bear its own costs or that each party will bear a certain percentage of the costs.

The official fees are determined in accordance with the Law on Court Fees.  The fees in each particular case will depend on the value of the legal matter they are related to. Moreover, the costs differ for civil and criminal proceedings.

Attorney’s fees can vary depending on the complexity of the case, its length, the number of activities undertaken, and other particulars of each case. It is therefore recommended to consult with the attorney on all potential costs of the proceedings before initiating the same.

13.5    PRELIMINARY INJUNCTION PROCEEDINGS

In cases of urgency, an interested party can seek a preliminary injunction (hereinafter: PI), as to provide provisional, but immediate legal protection. The request can be submitted to the competent Court during the proceedings, but also before the proceedings are initiated – under the condition that the complaint will be filed within 30 days of the date when the decision on acceptance of PI has been rendered.

In general, the PI is governed by the Law on Enforcement and Security  but specific rules related to IP rights are governed by specific laws (e.g. Law on Patents, Law on Trademarks, etc.). The content of the PI differs depending on the type of right.

Notwithstanding the specific character of each IP right, the following are generally the most common forms of PI relief in the Serbian legal system: 1) seizure or removal from the market of the infringing products; 2) seizure or removal from the market of the means (equipment, tools) used in the creation of the infringing products; 3) prohibition of the infringing actions.

The party seeking issuance of a PI must demonstrate probable that the infringement did occur, or in some exceptional cases (e.g. related to Industrial design) that there is a severe risk for the infringement to occur.

If an appeal is filed against a decision granting a PI, the same does not delay the enforcement of the PI.

In exceptional events, the court will allow the issuance of an ex parte PI.

13.6    CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS

The criminal procedure is governed by Law on Criminal Procedures. The main characteristics of these procedures are the following:

Unlike in civil proceedings, where only two courts are competent for dealing with IP matters, in criminal proceedings the general rules of competence apply. The first-instance courts are divided into the Basic Courts and the Higher Courts, while the second-instance tier is divided into the Higher Courts and the Courts of Appeal. The competence of each particular court depends on the nature of the criminal act and the prescribed penalty for the same.

Criminal proceedings commence with the investigation. The investigating authorities (i.e. Police) conduct the investigation upon the order of the prosecutor and under his or her supervision. In most cases, the injured party has no control over the criminal procedure, but there are certain mechanisms that enable a more active role in the proceedings. The injured party can assume the prosecutor’s place in the procedure, as subsequent prosecutor, if the prosecutor withdraws from the case. However, the prosecutor may also decide to continue the prosecution and to reestablish its procedural role.

If the evidence collected during the investigation confirms the guilt of the defendant beyond a reasonable doubt, the prosecutor files an indictment and represents the charge before the competent court.

The court may proceed only upon an indictment: the court may only establish the criminal liability of the person against whom the accusatory instrument was filed, and may only consider acts contained in the instrument. For that reason, the prosecutor is entitled to amend the indictment and the legal qualification of the criminal charges throughout the proceedings.

14    SPAIN

14.1    LEGAL FRAMEWORK

Spanish legislation in the civil area is harmonized since, although each state is free to promulgate their own rules, these must be in accordance and respect the general principles established by the European Union.

14.2    MAIN PRINCIPLES

In accordance with Spanish legislation all litigation between parties shall meet the following characteristics.

  1. In Spain, in regard to civil and mercantile matters, the Civil Procedure Law differentiates in function to the amount and subject between what type of trial is applicable to the specific case.
  2. Regardless of its amount, lawsuits in the area of unfair competition, intellectual property and publicity shall be decided in an ordinary trial except if they exclusively concern amount claims in which case they shall be dealt with by the corresponding proceeding in function of the amount claimed (an ordinary procedure corresponds if the claimed amount is more than 6,000€).
  3. The competent Courts are Mercantile Courts when dealing with complaints in which actions are exercised related to unfair competition, intellectual property and publicity.
  4. The process begins with the exercise of one or various actions through a complaint. Said action or actions are initiated by a subject that in procedural terms is deemed an actor or a complainant, who submits to a jurisdictional body a request so that their position is protected in litigation and their rights or legitimate interests protected. Such a request is addressed to the other subject deemed a defendant who according to the actor disturbs the right or legitimate interest, the protection of which is sought.
  5. In all judicial actions, the Judges, Magistrates, Prosecutors and other civil servants at the Courts and Tribunals shall use Castilian Spanish as the official language of the procedure. Likewise, if the parties do not object, the official language of a specific Autonomous Community may be used.
  6. There shall be a translation of all documents drafted in a language that is not Castilian Spanish or if the case, the official language of the Autonomous Community in question.
  7. In the area of intellectual property within an ordinary procedure, the holder of the rights may commence the termination of those actions that infringe upon them in addition to requesting the appropriate indemnification for the damages that have been caused whether economical or moral.
  8. Likewise, a request may be made prior to the commencement of judicial actions that the appropriate precautionary measures be adopted in order to urgently undertake the protection of their rights and avoid damages which could occur until the judge resolves the question.
  9. Notwithstanding the rules of Private International Law and those of a special nature, which could be applicable in the specific case, in Spanish legislation the general rule is that in the case of a defendant who is a natural person, the territorial jurisdiction shall correspond to the tribunal of the domicile of the defendant and if they did not have one in the national territory it shall be the competent judge of their residence in said territory.

Insofar as business owners and professionals, in litigation arising from their business or professional activity they may also be sued in the place where said activity takes place and if they had premises in different locations then in any of them at the actor’s choice.

Insofar as the territorial competence of the legal persons (companies) they shall be sued in the place of their domicile or in the place where the legal situation or relationship to which the litigation refers has arisen or must take effect provided that in said place it has an establishment open to the public or a representative authorized to act on behalf of the entity.

Specifically, and in particular among others, in the processes where there is the exercise of lawsuits concerning infringements of intellectual property the competent tribunal shall be the tribunal in the place in which the infringement has been committed or there exists evidence of commission or in which illegal items are found at the choice of the complainant.

In the area of Unfair competition the tribunal of the place where the defendant has their establishment shall be competent and in the absence of this their domicile or place of residence and when they do not have one within Spanish territory, the tribunal of the place where they have performed the act of unfair competition or where its effects have occurred at the choice of the defendant

In the area of Industrial Property, the tribunal which is competent shall be that which the Special legislation in this area indicates and which determines that the Mercantile Courts of the domicile of the defendant are the ones which are competent.

14.3    IMPORTANT MILESTONES OF A TRIAL

In Spain, ordinary trials are handled in the following phases:

14.3.1    Complaint

It is initiated by means of the lodging of a complaint in which must appear the identification of the actors and the defendant, the domicile or residence for the service of process, the facts, legal bases and the realization of that which is requested.

The documents which evidence the facts alleged by the complainant must be included as well as the expert reports on which they are supported.

The complaint must be signed by the lawyer and procurator.

It must be pointed out that in the ordinary Spanish procedure the intervention of the “procurator” is mandatory. The procurator is a technical representative before the court who among other functions is in charge of the notices between the court office and the party.

Each party of the process (complainant and defendant) has to have a procurator.

The procurator is an independent professional is paid fees apart from those of the lawyer.

14.3.2    Acceptance of the complaint

Acceptance of the handling of the complaint, service of process to the defendant and answer. The Judicial Secretary, having examined the complaint, shall issue a decree admitting it and shall have it transferred to the defendant in order for them to answer it in a period of 20 days.

14.3.3    Hearing prior to the trial

Once the complaint has been answered the Judicial secretary within 3 days shall convoke the parties for a hearing. The prior hearing shall be held within a period of 20 days from the convocation. The lawyer shall attend the hearing mandatorily.

In the prior hearing a settlement or transaction of the parties shall be attempted, procedural questions shall be examined which impede the continuation of the process, the issue of the process shall be established with precision and in the case that it were necessary evidence shall be proposed and admitted.

14.3.4    Trial

Once the evidence has been admitted, the Judge or Judicial Secretary shall indicate the trial date which shall be held in a period of 1 month from the time the hearing took place.

The aim of the trial shall be the practice of evidence and the formulation of conclusions therein.

14.3.5    Decision

The decision shall be issued within 20 days following the termination of the trial. If within the period in which to issue the decision, the final proceedings were agreed upon the period in order to issue them shall be suspended

The periods established by law are not usually complied with by judges (since the courts are saturated with matters underway.) Therefore, an ordinary procedure may take 1 or 2 years to be resolved depending on the Court that handles it.

14.3.6    Appeals

Against the Decisions of the Courts and Judicial Secretaries, which are unfavorable, the parties may initiate the appeals provided by law. The periods in which to appeal shall be calculated from the day following the notice of its clarification or its refusal.

In Spanish law there are various classes of appeals in function of the type of decision contested or whether the underlying reasons are material or procedural.

It must be pointed out here that the appeal through which one may seek that in accordance with the facts and legal basis formulated before the court of first instance the decision is reversed and another decision issued which is in favor of the appellant.

The Provincial Audience courts decide on these appeals.

After this type of appeal there only remains the Cassation Appeal before the Supreme Court which concerns solely appraisals.

14.4    THE PRELIMINARY RULING QUESTION BEFORE THE EUROPEAN COURT

Notwithstanding the aforementioned and regarding the subject of community law, any Judge in Spain when it has doubts on the application of a community regulation in a specific cause of action may pose a preliminary question to the Tribunal of Justice of the European Union. The Tribunal shall not decide on the issue and shall limit itself to informing the national Judge on the scope or the significance of the community rule.

14.5    LAWYERS’S FEE

In Spain it is normal to request the judge to order the opposing party to pay  judicial costs. In this sense, the judges usually award them in the case that they deem all the allegations of the complaint frivolous and bad faith in litigating is detected. Costs refer to expenses of defense and representation, costs generated by experts, advertisements, certifications and similar documents.

14.6    INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY ACTIONS

Against any infringement of rights regulated in Spain in the area of Intellectual and Industrial Property, civil, criminal or administrative actions may be exercised.

On the civil subject, these actions shall be exercised through the procedure for an ordinary trial and are summarized as follows:

  • Declaratory judgment of null and void or infringement.
  • The suspension of the infringing activity.
  • The prohibition that the infringing party renew it the infringing activity.
  • The commercial removal of illegal samples and their destruction.
  • The disabling and in the necessary case, destruction of the
  • moulds, plates, negative matrixes and other elements designated exclusively to the reproduction of the illegal materials.
  • The sealing of the apparatus used in the non-authorized public communication as well as the instruments used in order to facilitate the suppression or the non-authorized neutralization of any technical device.
  • The confiscation, disabling and in the necessary case, the destruction of the instruments on the infringing party’s account, whose sole use is to facilitate the removal or non-authorized neutralization of any technical device used in order to protect a computer program
  • The suspension of services rendered by intermediaries to third parties who make use of them in order to infringe on intellectual property rights.

Insofar as the indemnification for damages and injuries due to the holder of the infringed right it shall include not only the value of the loss that they have incurred but also that of the earnings which they have stopped due to the infringement of their right. In the case of moral damages their indemnification shall proceed even when an economic injury has not been proven. For their valuation, attention shall be given to the circumstances of the serious infraction of the injury and degree of illegal diffusion of the work.

The Statute of Limitations for an action in order to claim for damages and injuries in the area of Intellectual Property shall be 5 years from when the person with standing could exercise it.

Likewise in the case of infringement or when there exists a rational fear and based on the fact that it is going to occur imminently the judicial authority may decree on the request of the holders of the rights, precautionary measures that according to the circumstances were necessary for the urgent protection of said rights and that are summarized as follows:

  • The intervention of the earnings that have been obtained with the illegal activity
  • The suspension of the activities of reproduction, distribution and public communication according to the cases
  • The seizure of reproduced or used samples and the material used for reproduction and public communication.
  • The confiscation of the equipment, apparatus and materials used.

14.7    INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY ACTIONS

14.7.1    Brand

The owner of a registered brand may exercise before the jurisdictional bodies through an ordinary judgment the civil actions that correspond against those who infringe on their rights and request the necessary measures in order for their safe-keeping, regardless of submission to arbitration, if it were possible.

These actions are summarized as follows:

  • Declaratory judgment of nullity or infringement
  • The termination of the acts that infringe on their rights.
  • The indemnification of damages and injuries incurred.
  • The adoption of the measures necessary in order to prevent that its infringement continue and in particular that the products, packing, publicity material labels be removed from economic trading and the confiscation or destruction of the measures aimed at committing the infringement.
  • The destruction or termination for humanitarian purposes if it were possible at the choice of the complainant and at the cost of the non-prevailing party of the illegally identified products which are in possession of the infringing party.
  • The allocation of ownership of the confiscated products, materials and means in which case the value of the goods effected shall be attributed to the amount of the indemnification of damages and injuries (insofar as there is an excess amount the owner of the registered brand shall compensate the other party for this surplus)
  • The publication of the decision at the cost of the losing party by means of advertisements and notices to interested parties.

Likewise, the infringement of a right of Intellectual Property usually produces damages to the holder for which there must be compensation by indemnification means due to damages and injuries.

The indemnification of damages and injuries shall consist of not only the losses incurred but also the lost profits of the owner of the registration of the brand which is the cause of the infringement of their right. The owner of the brand registry may request the indemnification of the damage caused to the prestige of the brand by the infringing party especially by a defective realization of illegally branded product or an inadequate presentation of those in the market as well as research expenses incurred in order to obtain reasonable proof of the commission of the infringement object of the judicial procedure.

For the establishment of the indemnification for damages and injuries, the following shall be taken into account on the choice of the injured parties.

  • The negative economic consequences (profits that the holder would have obtained by means of the use of the brand if the violation had not taken place and those that infringing party has obtained as a consequence of the infringement).
  • The amount that as a price the infringing party would have had to pay the holder for the concession of a license that would have permitted them to undertake their utilization.

As with Intellectual Property the infringement of a right of Industrial Property enables the holder of that infringed right to request the adoption of precautionary measures that tend to ensure the actions that are going to be undertaken.

Actions arising from the infringement of a registered brand shall have a 5 year Statute of Limitation, counting from the day on which they could be exercised.

14.7.2    Patent

The holder of a patent may exercise before the jurisdictional bodies through an ordinary judgment procedure the civil actions that correspond against those who damage their right and demand the necessary measures for their safe-keeping.

Specifically, the holder of the patent right which is damaged may request:

  • The suspension of the acts that infringe on their right.
  • The indemnification for damages and injuries incurred.
  • The confiscation of the objects produced or imported with the infringement of their rights and the means designated to its production.
  • Attribution of ownership of the objects or means confiscated in which case the value of the goods effected shall be attributed to the value of the indemnification awarded (as for that which exceeded it the holder of the registered brand shall compensate the other party for the excess amount).
  • The adoption of the measures necessary in order to prevent the infringement of the patent from continuing and in particular the transformation of the objects or means confiscated or their destruction when it were indispensible in order to impede the infringement of the patent.
  • The publication of the decision finding that the party infringed on a patent.

The indemnification for damages and injuries comprise not only the value of the loss that has been incurred, but also that of the profit that has not been obtained by the holder as a result of the infringement of their right. The indemnification amount may include if the case the research costs incurred in order to obtain reasonable evidence of the commission of the infringement which is object of the judicial proceeding.

In order to establish the indemnification for damages and injuries the following shall be taken into account on the choice of the prejudiced party:

  • The negative economic consequences among which are the foreseeable profits that the holder would have obtained from the economic exploitation of the patented invention if the competition of the infringing party had not existed and the profits that the latter would have obtained from the exploitation of the patented invention.
  • The amount which as a price the infringing party would have had to pay the holder of the patent due to the granting of license that would have permitted them to undertake its economic exploitation in conformity with the law.

The Statute of Frauds for actions arising from the infringement of the patent rights shall be 5 years counting from the day on which they could be exercised.

In the area of Intellectual and Industrial Property without prejudice to the civil actions that may be exercised and that we have mentioned previously, the decisions of the Spanish Office of Patents and Brands, being acts arising with the Administration, are appealable via the contentious-administrative regimen.

Likewise and in regard to the criminal area, the Spanish Criminal code provides a punishment for crimes related to Intellectual and Industrial Property with sentences that range from a fine to imprisonment. For which, any subject who considers themselves aggrieved has the standing in order to initiate penal proceedings either through a criminal report or by means of a lawsuit.

In particular, and in accordance to this regulation, an offense against intellectual property occurs when:

  • In order to obtain a direct or indirect benefit and to the detriment of a third party, to duplicate, plagiarize, distribute, publicly communicate or otherwise exploit, wholly or partly, a literary work or performance – artistic or scientific – or its conversion, interpretation or artistic performance thereof scheduled on any sort of medium or communicated by any means, without the consent of the holders or assignees of the respective intellectual property rights.
  • Who, in the provision of services of an information Company, with a view of gaining a direct or indirect economic benefit, and to the detriment of third parties, provides in an active and non-neutral manner and without being limited to a merely technical process, access or detection on internet of projects or services subject to intellectual property without the the consent of the holders or assignees of the respective intellectual property rights, particularly by offering catalogued and classified lists of links to the projects and content previously mentioned, even if said links had been initially provided by the beneficiaries of their services.
  • As well as those who:
  1. Export or intentionally store copies of the projects, productions or versions referred to in the first two paragraphs of this article, including digital copies without aforementioned consent when they are intended to be reproduced, distributed or publicly communicated.
  2. They intentionally import these products without such consent when they are intended to be duplicated, distributed or publicly communicated whether they have a lawful or unlawful origin in their country of provenance. However, importation of such products from a European Union State shall not be punishable when those have been acquired directly from the holders of the respective intellectual property rights in said State, or with his consent.
  3. Encourage the implementation of the conduct referred to in paragraphs 1 and 2 of this article eliminating or altering, without the consent of the holders or assignees of the respective intellectual property rights, the effective technological measures introduced by them in order to prevent or restrict their implementation.
  4. With a view to obtaining a direct or indirect economic benefit, in order to provide third parties with access to a copy of a literary, artistic or scientific work or to its conversion, interpretation or artistic performance thereof scheduled on any sort of medium or communicated by any means, without the consent of the holders or assignees of the respective intellectual property rights, bypass or ease the circumvention of effective technological measures to prevent it.

In the area of Industrial Property will incur in an offense against industrial property those who:

  • For industrial or commercial purposes, without a patent or utility models holders consent and with knowledge of its registration, manufactures, imports, possesses, uses, offers or introduces objects protected by such rights into the market. Also regarding objects protected by third parties of an industrial or artistic model or design or semiconductor topographies.
  • Whoever uses or offers the use of a patented process, or possesses, offers, introduces into the market, or uses the product directly attained from the patented process.
  • Who with industrial or commercial purposes without the consent from a holder of an industril property right registered under the trademark law and with knowledge of its registration:
  1. manufactures, produces or imports products including a distinctive sign which is identical or similar thereto, or
  2. offers, distributes or wholesale marketing of products which include a distinctive sign which is identical or similar thereto, or stores them for that purpose when they are identical or similar products, services or activities for which the industrial property has been registered
  • Whoever for industrial or commercial purposes without the consent from a holder of an industrial property right registered under the trademark law and with knowledge of its registration offers, distributes or markets retail, or provides services or develops activities which include a distinctive sign identical or similar thereto, when they are identical or similar products, services or activities for which the industrial property has been registered
  • The occasional sale of products.
  • Whoever for agricultural or commercial purposes without the consent of the holder of a plant variety certificate and with knowledge of its registration, manufactures or duplicates, arranges for manufacture or duplication, offers for sale, sells or markets in any other way, exports or imports, or possesses for any of the aforementioned purposes, plant material for duplication or multiplication of a protected plant variety according to National or European Union legislation on plant variety protection.
  • Who uses in the course of trade a designation of origin or geographical indication representative of a particular quality legally protected in order to identify the products safeguarded by them, with knowledge of this safeguarding. this document according to the new legislation

The Spanish Penal Code contemplates the possibility that those crimes deemed flagrant and which are committed against Intellectual and Industrial Property rights be tried by the procedure provided for by the “Law on Quick Trials”. In order for a crime to be able to be tried by means of this procedure, a series of requisites are established among which it is contemplated that the crime is flagrant, in the sense that there is no solution of continuity between the commission of the punishable fact and the police actions that lead to the citation or arrest, that it concerns some of the specifically valued crimes and that it deals with a punishable fact in which an instructor facility is detected that is to say, that the investigation is short and simple.

Note that with the entry into force of Organic Law 1/2015, which amends the Criminal Code and presents new developments in intellectual and industrial property, modifications are made regarding criminal acts that were already regulated, and which we have adjusted in this document according to the new legislation.

The concept of misdemeanor, for less serious offenses, is removed and therefore not punishable.

Additionally, the reform has substantially extended the confiscation regulation, in other words, the possibility for the judge or court to order the delivery of goods, effects and profits used as an instrument and /or which are the proceeds of crime, extending its implementation to crimes against intellectual property.

Furthermore, amendments are made to the Criminal Procedure Law which have implications in the area of intellectual and industrial property, thus extending the possibility of early elimination of the effects seized from crimes against intellectual and industrial property provided they are assessed by an expert and sufficient samples are preserved for further verifications.

15    SWITZERLAND

15.1    LEGAL FRAMEWORK

Switzerland has 26 cantons (states). Each canton has established its civil courts (first and second instance) for the jurisdiction in the area of the Swiss federal civil law. All civil law in Switzerland is federal law. Cantonal law is limited to the public sector, for which the federal constitution did not give the legislative competence to the Federation (e.g. tax law for the cantonal tax). Before 2011 each and every canton had even its own procedural law for the application of the federal civil law. However, on January 1, 2011 the new Swiss Code of Civil Procedure (CCP) entered into force and replaced the 26 civil procedural laws of the cantons.

The new CCP applies to all civil matters that are in dispute before Swiss courts; there is, however, one exception: For proceedings before the Swiss Federal Supreme Court the procedure applies according to the Swiss Federal Supreme Court Act, which was enacted already in 2005. The organization of the cantonal courts is still in the competence of the cantons.

15.2    MAIN PRINCIPLES OF PROCEEDINGS

  1. Where can a suit be filed? The plaintiff has now the right to choose, whether to sue the 
defendant at his domicile/seat or at the place of performance of the characteristic service. The 
place of performance is the place where the service that characterizes the contractual obligation in question has to be carried out. The characteristic service is the action that comprises the typical attribute of the respective contract type. As an example, the development work of the software provider in case of a software development contract is the characteristic service. The remuneration for the software development (the obligation of the customer) is not regarded as characterizing the service. The place at which this performance is to be done is normally stipulated in the agreement.

In practice, agreements on jurisdiction are very 
important:  the parties specify in their contract – usually in 
advance – which court shall have jurisdiction over their dispute case. As in the past, the stipulated court and the choice of the law that governs the 
agreement must be identified in a precise manner. The stipulated court cannot deny 
its jurisdiction, but must accept the case. A contractual arrangement on jurisdiction is valid if it can be proven 
by text; this includes a respective “click” of agreement in a website.

  1. In order to reduce the workload of the courts and facilitate the parties’ first step in the 
legal arena, proceedings must, as a matter of principle, be preceded by an attempt of conciliation or mediation.

Requests for conciliation or mediation disrupt the statute of !imitations; for the mediation this is only the case, if the mediation is requested 
from the official conciliation authorities.

However, for disputes which are heard only before one cantonal court (e.g., the commercial court for commercial cases), 
there is no possibility to attempt  a conciliation. 
This has the consequence, that the disruption of the statute of limitations requires the filing of the formal suit instead 
of a conciliation request.

  1. The court has a large degree of flexibility to structure the proceeding. Depending on the amount in dispute and the complexity of the case, a simpler or 
a more detailed proceeding can be ordered. A civil case begins with a written statement of claim followed by a written statement of defense. Then the case continues with oral 
arguments at the beginning of the hearing phase. 
 If less than CHF 30’000 is 
in dispute, parties may present their respective 
positions by oral statements. However, the court can also order a second exchange of written submissions and, moreover, 
summon the parties to a preparatory hearing prior to the main hearing. Because the court has considerable freedom in how 
the proceeding is to be conducted, for example, 
the parties cannot know at the beginning of the proceeding what the deadline is for their presentation of allegations and facts and for submission of the corresponding evidence.

15.3    LEGAL REMEDIES AGAINST THE JUDGMENT

  1. Essentially any decision 
handed down by a cantonal court of first instance 
can be challenged before a higher cantonal court (cantonal court of appeal or cantonal supreme court), after which it can go before the Swiss
Federal Supreme Court. An exception, however, applies for 
commercial courts (that exist e.g. in the 
cantons of Zurich, St.Gallen and Bern) and for actions in specific areas of law (such as intellectual property law): The decisions of these commercial courts of the cantons must be 
appealed directly with the Swiss Federal Supreme 
Court.
  2. The CCP has two principal legal remedies: the 
appeal and the request for setting- 
aside; the three further remedies of revision, interpretation and correction do not play an important role. Both the appeal and the request for setting-aside 
must be filed with the appellate instance within 30 
days, in writing and with arguments. The deadline 
may not be extended. This means that a party which
has not been successful before the first instance must decide within short notice whether to challenge the lower court’s decision before the higher cantonal instance. The relative short deadline of 30 days from 
the issuance of the. lower court’s decision is not the only challenge to be considered: If 
the lower court issues its decision without giving written reasons, the losing party must request written reasons within 10 days, without 
which the law assumes that the right to challenge the decision before the higher court has been waived.
  3. The main difference between the appeal and the 
request for setting-aside is that the appeal is intended for cases with an amount in dispute of at 
least CHF 10’000, whereas the request for 
setting-aside covers cases below that amount as well as 
decisions concerning the enforcement of civil judgments. Decisions handed down during a first-instance proceeding are subject to appeal if they 
are actually procedural or substantive interim decisions (e.g., the dismissal of a plea under the 
limitation of actions). To the contrary, procedural orders are – where applicable – to be challenged 
through a request for setting-aside.

15.4    COSTS OF LITIGATION

The costs of litigation consist of the court fees and the attorneys’ fees. The cantons are competent to regulate these fees. Thus, the CCP has not standardized the cost of litigation.

The court can demand an advance of the court fees from the plaintiff up to the presumed amount, and -on request of the defendant- to secure the attorneys’ fees if the plaintiff has its domicile/legal seat outside of Switzerland. The security can be in cash or as a guarantee of a bank or an insurance company established in Switzerland. If the advance or the security is not performed within the deadline set by the court the action is –after a period of grace- dismissed.

For the costs of taking of evidence the court demands also the respective advance; if it is not paid in due time the taking of evidence is ceased.

Normally the court decides on the costs of litigation in its final decision; the losing party has to bear them, unless the court decides otherwise under certain circumstances listed in the CCP. If the case is settled by an agreement before the court the cost of litigation are distributed according to the proportion of the agreement.

For proceedings before the Swiss Federal Supreme Court the costs of litigations are regulated in the Swiss Federal Supreme Court Act.

15.5    ARBITRATION

  1. Important especially for disputes in commercial matters, Arbitration has a high importance. The CPP concerns itself not 
only with civil litigation before state courts, but also with the procedure before private arbitral tribunals established in Switzerland between parties who are residing in Switzerland.
  2. It is certainly not a surprise, that arbitral proceedings are different from proceedings before a state court; in particular, the parties 
have themselves the right to determine the composition of the 
arbitral tribunal (with members whom they trust) 
and even to define the procedural rules. And what is most important:
A decision of an arbitral tribunal has the same 
legal binding effect as a final and enforceable decision by a state 
court. Another key difference is that arbitration 
proceedings are not conducted in public, bunt behind closed doors. It is exactly this confidentiality that arbitration is often the preferred way of settling disputes arising from commercial agreements, which the parties wish to keep confidential.
  3. When the parties agree on arbitration, they are not bound to the inflexible rules of the CCP, but can instead specify the procedural rules of the arbitration. Very often the parties adopt the procedural rules of 
an existing arbitration institution. Within the limits of mandatory procedural rights (such as equal treatment 
and due process) the arbitral tribunal determines 
the details on how to conduct the proceedings in close coordination with the ideas of the parties.
  4. The arbitral decision (award) is only and exclusively subject to an action for annulment by the Swiss Federal Supreme 
Court. However, only in very exceptional cases the 
Swiss Federal Supreme Court is in a position to annul an arbitral award. The Swiss Federal Supreme Court does not verify as to 
whether the arbitral tribunal made the right material decision; even an arbitral award that is erroneous is overruled only in instances when it would lead to arbitrary results.

16    TURKEY

16.1    LEGAL FRAMEWORK

Law of Procedure in Turkey consists of civil procedure, administrative procedure and criminal procedure, legislative sources of which are based on the European systems. For instance, the Code of Civil Procedure (“HMK”) ( [21]) was legislated as per the Civil Procedure of Neuchatel Canton (Switzerland) and has been entirely renewed in 2011. Criminal Procedure Law (“CMK”) ( [22]), entirely renewed in 2005, is based on German criminal procedure (for the criminal code was taken from Germany); whereas the Law of Administrative Procedure (“IYUK”) ([23] ) was legislated as per French administrative law and is still being subject to alterations in accordance with the day’s circumstances and in order to comply with the development in the European acquis.

National factors, such as traditions, culture, previous Supreme Court decisions and previous State Council decisions for administrative actions, shape the overall concept of the law of procedure hence the legislations sustain national characteristics, rather differently than their source codifications, especially in terms of their applications in practice.

16.2    MAIN PRINCIPLES

1)            As regards to the first instance in civil law actions; a case may either be subject to “written trial procedure (serial procedure)”, which is the main rule for civil procedures; or to “simple trial procedure (proceedings in oral)” which is applied by but not limited to the labour courts (i.e. compensation claims deriving from employment relations), civil enforcement courts (i.e. opposition to the enforcement officer’s treatments, cancellation of a tender), courts of consumer rights and cases that shall be seen before civil courts of peace.

2)            In general a person needs not sending a warning letter via notary public in order to obtain the right to start an action. However, in some cases, proving of plaintiff’s bad faith is mandatory, example of which is action negatoria that covers the disputes deriving from the rights in rem for real estates. In such cases it is necessary to first send the warning letter via notary public and wait for the notified party to act in accordance with the warning. If the party does not act so, an action can be started by using the warning letter as an important evidence.

3)            In terms of first instance litigation; all civil courts (commercial court, court of cadastre, IP court, consumer rights court, civil enforcement court, court of peace, court of first instance) have one judge whereas in criminal actions there is a panel of three judges in high criminal courts and one judge in criminal court of first instance and court of peace. Administrative courts are differently associated when compared to civil and criminal courts. There shall be one judge if the monetary claim is above the limit determined for the relevant year (28000 Turkish Lira – appr. € 10000 – for 2014) and three judges if above the monetary limit. Same limit applies for claiming a hearing before the court.

4)            When starting an action the parties usually submit their evidence. The first petition of the claimant, along with the evidence, must be duly delivered to the defendant(s) and the legal fees of the trial must be paid by the claimant; or the cause of action shall be deemed incomplete. Petitions submitted to the court must be delivered to both parties until all petitions (bill of claims, bill of replies, bill of replications and bill of duplications) are duly collected by the judge, along with the evidences.

As for administrative procedure, it is a cause of action to send

the bill of claims to the defendant(s). Legal fees must also be paid or the litigation shall not start, the number of case number shall not even be determined.

5)            Following the assessment of all evidence and statements, the local court decides on the substance of the conflict in hand and both parties have the right to appeal this decision before the Supreme Court. The time limitation for appealing depends on the type of litigation. (e.g. 15 days for commercial law cases, 8 days for labour law matters, etc.)

In administrative cases, though, if the decision is given by a one-judge-court, the name of the further action shall be “opposition” before the Regional Administrative Court. If the decision is given by three judges, then the parties may appeal the decision before the State Council.

Decisions of Supreme Courts can be subject to a “revision of decision” process; however some decisions cannot be subject to revision of decision procedure. Most striking cases are mainly decisions given on employment claims, decisions given by civil court of peace, although there are certain exceptions to this rule.

Decisions of the State Council for administrative cases can also be subject to revision of decision if and only if the revision claims fall within at least one of the points mentioned expressly in “IYUK” (administrative trial procedure act).

A further instance is “Renewal of judgment” procedure, which can only be requested should there are newly obtained evidences,  which was not possible to obtain during the trial, that shall strikingly change the fate and result of the trial concluded previously. This remedy is very rare but still an important remedy.

Another last instance is judgment of the finalised decision before the Constitutional Court. This does not count as a trial

instance, for the nature of bringing an action before the Constitutional Court necessitates breach of constitutional rights of the applicant party.

16.3    IMPORTANT MILESTONES OF A TRIAL

16.3.1    First instance procedure

In terms of civil law procedure; judgment starts before relevant local courts as the first instance. The case opens with the submission of the claimant’s first petition and payment of the official judgment fees. Following this the court shall start collecting the petitions and evidences and decide whether the preliminary examination shall be made with a hearing or not. After evaluating the legal courses of the action and the preliminary objections of the parties, the court starts to examine the matter of substances. If the defendant duly opposes to the action by reason of expiration of the legal time period for the claimant to start the action, the whole case can be rejected due to procedural matters, prior to the court’s examination of the matter of substance. Therefore the procedure law rules are of vital importance for lawyers.

Although every attorney must be recorded with the bar association of only one city, all attorneys can represent their clients before all Turkish civil courts, by reason of being recorded also with the Union of Bars of Turkey.

As per administrative cases; administrative trials start with submission of claimant’s petition and payment of legal fees. If a wrongful action of the administration is received or faced with, the trial must be started within 30 days before the tax court following the official receipt or occurrence of the taxation action and 60 days before the administrative courts following the official receipt or occurrence of the administrative action.

16.3.2    Judgment and further Appeals

In terms of civil law procedure; parties can appeal the decision before the Supreme Court. Although the remedy of “civil appeal” is mentioned within the “HMK”, the courts of civil appeal are not yet established and therefore, as mentioned within the law, the remedies for civil appeal shall apply for the remedy before the Supreme Courts.  Principles of the Civil Procedural Law (“HMK”) mostly need to be raised and emphasised by the parties during the law practice, whereas the criminal procedure and administrative trial procedure are mostly considered by the courts ex-officio.

Once the local court gives its decision on the case, there may either be an appealing period or not ([24] ). The appealing period starts either after the pronouncement of the verdict or after official receipt thereof by the parties’.

There are different legal periods for different jurisdictions: The appealing period for civil court of first instance and commercial courts is 15 days; where as it is 10 days for civil enforcement decisions, 8 days for labour court decisions and civil court of peace decisions. ([25] )

The period to reply to appealing claims is 10 days following the receipt of the appealing petition of the appealing party. Different appealing grounds may also be stated in addition to the reply. This procedure is called “appealing via merger”.

Supreme Court of Civil Department examines the appeal claims and the decisions it may give are “approving” of the local court’s decision; “reverse” of the whole judgment by indicating the grounds thereof; or “rectifying” the decision, which means “approving of the decision by re-assessing the bits that do not affect the result, without altering its substance” e.g. by correcting the grounds without changing the result thereof. The Supreme Court cannot give a definitive and final decision on the case but merely examines the legality of the decision and indicates the necessary legal steps and grounds that the local court should follow.

If the Supreme Court reverses the decision, the file case then goes back to the court of first instance (or “local court”) in order for it to re-assesses the case within the frame of Supreme Court’s evaluation and decision. Accordingly the local court either follows the Supreme Court’s decision; or, it insists on its own decision. Both of these decisions may be appealed against, by the parties.

At this stage;

  1. If the local court decides to insist on the first decision and if this decision is also appealed, this time the case goes to the Supreme Court Assembly of Civil Chambers. The decision given by the Assembly is definitive and binding.
  2. If the local court accepts to comply with Supreme Court’s decision, the court shall follow Supreme Court’s ruling and this second decision of the local court can also be appealed before the Supreme Court and the procedure continues.

If, however, the Supreme Court approves the decision, there is no remedy for re-appealing this decision. However, if the conditions are met, this decision can be subject to “revision of decision” requests.

As per criminal actions (described also under sub-heading no.6); the 7 day appeal period starts either after the pronouncement of the verdict or after serving (i.e. official communication) of it to parties’ addresses. The Supreme Court of Criminal Chambers examines the appealing claims and may “approve” the decision of the local court; it may “reverse” the whole judgment by indicating the grounds for reversing it; or it may “rectify” the decision, meaning “approving the decision by rewriting the reasoning” e.g. by correcting the grounds without changing the result thereof. The rest is similar to civil law procedure. The appealing of criminal actions is examined by the “Penal Department” of the Court of Appeal.

As per the administrative law actions; the local administrative court (tax court or administration court) decisions shall either be opposed to before the District Administration Court or be appealed before the State Council. The period to oppose to a decision before the District Administration Court or the State Council is thirty days following the date of receipt of the decision.

16.4    REVISION

Following the appealing stages on civil procedure the decision given by the Supreme Court may be subject to a “revision of decision” procedure. This is counted as an “extraordinary remedy” and may only be examined by the Supreme Court Assembly of Civil Chambers if some certain conditions within procedure law legislations are met. Legal time period to apply to this remedy is 15 days following the definitive decision of the Supreme Court.

16.5    COSTS AND FEES

The losing party must bear the legal court fees and the attorney(s) fees. If both parties win and/or lose to a certain extent, the court decides on attorney fee according to the winning proportion, thus both parties bear attorney fee of the other party. The court fees and the attorney fees are calculated on the basis of the litigation type and value. The calculation of attorney fees are based on a ‘minimum fee tariff’ officially determined every year by the Union of Turkish Bar Associations and published in the official gazette of Turkey. In this respect, the parties are not awarded other attorney fees (i.e. the fees that they agreed to pay separately to their lawyers).

16.6    PRELIMINARY INJUNCTION PROCEEDINGS

In Turkey demanding preliminary injunction is a common approach especially when the claimant has some belief that the defendant may transfer the property right of the object of litigation to a third party which causes the claimant to be unable to gain the utility expected from starting the litigation. Preliminary injunction shall be requested from the authorised court which also be the court the litigation is before. The court can decide, even ex parte and before the preliminary examination, often on the date the claimant’s petition is examined, on imposing a preliminary injunction. If the decision on preliminary injunction is given ex parte, without hearing the other party/parties, then the other party /parties may oppose to this decision in one week following the date of receipt of the decision. Also, in case there are third parties whose rights are breached by reason of this decision, those third parties may also oppose to this decision (following the date of discovery/cognition).

If the court decides to perform the preliminary examination via a hearing and serves both parties the date of this hearing, then the oppositions to such an injunction shall be considered during this hearing. If the court decides to revoke such an injunction, the defendant has a claim for compensation for his loss.

16.7    CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS

As per the criminal law procedure; commencement of trial starts with the bill of indictment of the prosecutor (if there is no decision of non-prosecution), at the relevant local courts as first instance. Once the local court gives its decision on the case, there may either be an appealing period or not, that is to say, should the prosecutor gives the “decision for non-prosecution” then the person of interest (the suspect) shall be released and he/she shall not have any criminal records because of this prosecution. If the prosecutor drafts the bill of indictment, the hearing procedure starts and the legal name of the suspect becomes “perpetrator” (alleged criminal).  Depending on the type of the crime, the alleged criminal shall be tried before a criminal court of peace, criminal court of first instance or high criminal court, either with or without arrest.

Certain criminal sanctions are also available in commercial law, enforcement law, administrative law, IP law and IT law, which are legislated separately within their own acts and/or regulations.

The high criminal court consists of three judges, including a chief judge. In criminal courts of first instance and high criminal courts the hearing prosecutor takes place nearby the panel of judge(s). Following some period of collecting evidences, arraignment, witness’ sworn statements and such and prior to the judgment of the court, the prosecutor gives his/her opinion as to the accusations and the court may or may not follow this opinion.

As a general rule the decisions of criminal court are appealable. The party who believes the decision shall be overruled must appeal the decision in 7 days following the announcement (if that party attended

to the hearing in which the decision was given) or duly serving of the verdict. If the Supreme Court decides to return the judgment by indicating the legal approach to be taken by the first instance court, then the judgment shall be carried on according to this decision. If the first instance court insists on its decision and if this decision is also appealed by a party, the case shall be examined by the Supreme Court Assembly of Criminal Chambers.

The decision of this Assembly is a definitive and abiding. Unlike the civil law procedure parties cannot apply for a “revision of decision” procedure against the decision of the Assembly. However, the Chief Public Prosecutor may oppose to the decision of the Assembly, which is an extraordinary legal remedy. In practice the party who would like to trigger the chief prosecutor to apply for this remedy drafts a petition addressing the Chief Prosecutor.

17    THE NETHERLANDS

17.1    LEGAL FRAMEWORK

The judicial process is one of those matters which has been only harmonized a little within the European Union. Each member state, including The Netherlands, is relatively free to set the rules for procedures conducted before its national courts. However, states must act in accordance with the general principles, issuing, in particular, from the European Convention on Human Rights.

17.2    GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF CIVIL PROCEDURAL LAW

The main principles under the Netherlands civil procedural law can be summarized as follows:

1)            Most civil proceedings require the preparation of written position. Even when the law allows itself to be limited to oral considerations, it is recommended at most times to file, in addition, written evidence (see also paragraph 0).

2)            In civil matters, each party must notify the other in writing, in principle at the beginning of the proceedings, regarding the pieces of evidence on which the legal action is based. The risk of a last minute surprise or of a hidden item, discovered during the hearing, is relatively low in the Netherlands.

3)            Civil proceedings in the Netherlands are initiated either by writ of summons (dagvaarding) or by petition (verzoekschrift). In that respect a distinction is usually made between contentious and voluntary jurisdiction of the courts. There are no clear criteria by which both types of jurisdiction can be distinguished. As a rough-and-ready rule one could say that contentious jurisdiction covers the matters in which the court has to resolve a dispute between parties, while voluntary jurisdiction sees to matters in which the court is requested to grant a general provision or an appropriate measure.

4)            In civil proceedings there are special legal measures available for plaintiffs to obtain provisional relief affecting property of debtors to obtain security for judgments to be obtained. A distinction must be made between a conservatoir beslag, i.e., protective measures by attachment which anticipate a later judgment and executoriaal beslag, i.e., enforcement measures by attachment to be taken after the  judgment has been obtained. As a result of the relatively new requirements (2011) for the petition for attachments, it has become somewhat more difficult, costly and time-consuming for a creditor to lay an attachment on the assets of its debtor: a creditor is required to provide more information and background to the case (and earlier proceedings), before it will be able to obtain leave from the competent judge to lay a conservatory attachment.

5)            Under the Netherlands law, a party is required to submit documents and information (whether electronically stored or not) if and in so far as they relate to a specific legal relationship (tort, contract); are described with sufficient specificity and are in the possession of the party that is being asked to submit them (exhibitieplicht).

6)            The adversarial principle is the basic guideline in civil law proceedings; unilateral measures are the exception. Unilateral measures are those taken at the request of a party, without the judge hearing the other party. They are generally reserved for cases in which the judge recognizes that the element of surprise is necessary (f.i ex parte injunctions in IP matters). Sometimes, it is extreme urgency that justifies the assumption of ‘surprise’ but it is relatively rare (it must be demonstrated that the urgency is such that it is necessary to derogate from the fundamental principle of adversarial proceedings in court).

7)            There is a significant difference between substantive proceedings on the merits and preliminary proceedings. Substantive proceedings on the merits are basically intended to definitively decide the dispute (subject to a party making an appeal). In preliminary proceedings, the judge does not decide the dispute but has the power, under certain conditions, to

arrange a provisional situation. Preliminary injunction proceedings are increasingly common, especially in cases related to IP and innovation. This is one of the first things to check, because if this is the case, there is no time to lose (see paragraph 0 below).

17.3    TWO TYPES OF CIVIL PROCEEDINGS

All civil proceedings in the Netherlands are conducted before professional judges. Jury trials do not exist in The Netherlands. In the context of IT/IP disputes the following types of proceedings are common: preliminary proceedings (kortgeding) and substantive proceedings on the merits (bodemprocedure). For patent cases, there is also a specific type of proceedings on the merits available, i.e. ‘accelerated proceedings on the merits’ (Versneld Regime in Octrooizaken (VRO)).

17.3.1    Preliminary proceedings

In general, preliminary proceedings are the manner in which IT/IP disputes are litigated in The Netherlands. The plaintiff needs to have and assert an urgent interest for preliminary relief for the matter to be admissible in preliminary proceedings. In general, trade mark or copyright infringement in fact implies an urgent interest. The plaintiff first sends a draft of the writ of summons to the District Court. The court will then set a date for oral argument, taking into consideration the schedule of the court and the schedules of the counsel(s) (to an extent). Usually, a hearing will be scheduled within two to eight weeks after the writ has been submitted. The proceedings are started by serving the writ of summons upon the defendant.

At the hearing both parties can argue their case and it is only at that occasion that the defendant has to present the true scope and nature of its defence. Preliminary proceedings take place before one judge only, and only allow for preliminary measures to be awarded. The nature of preliminary proceedings is informal and the judge has large discretionary powers, in particular in matters of evidence. Evidence is primarily in the form of documents that have to be submitted to the court before the oral hearing. As a general rule, live testimony by witnesses is not available in preliminary proceedings. A judgment can be obtained within approximately 2 to 3 months from the date of the writ of summons.

Please note that TRIPS and the Dutch Code of Civil Procedure provide that the plaintiff will have to start substantive proceedings on the merits within a “reasonable period” after an injunction has been obtained in preliminary proceedings, failure of which will lead to the lapse of the judgment. When taking a preliminary injunction, the preliminary judge determines the “reasonable period” for bringing the claim to the substantive proceedings on the merits (frequently 6 months after the preliminary injunction). However, in many cases parties reach a settlement after preliminary proceedings in order to avoid lengthy proceedings on the merits.

17.3.2    Substantive proceedings on the merits

In regular substantive proceedings on the merits each party will have the opportunity to file procedural documents. The plaintiff will file a writ of summons and the defendant a statement of defence.

At the judge’s discretion the parties will have to appear in court (to provide more information and/or to try to reach a settlement) and/or will have the opportunity to file further briefs. Once all briefs have been filed the court can schedule oral pleadings on the request of either party. If the court is of the opinion that parties have had sufficient opportunity to orally discuss the case during a prior personal appearance it may decide not to schedule oral pleadings. Oral pleadings are usually held 12 to 18 months after the start of the proceedings and a judgment can then be expected within 6-12 weeks from the date of the oral pleadings. The Court may persist a judgment if it suits her.

17.4    MILESTONES OF THE CIVIL LAWSUIT

17.4.1    Competence of the court in first instance

There is an important dispute concerning the question of which court has jurisdiction. The Netherlands is divided into eleven districts, each with its own court. The district court is made up of a maximum of five sectors. These always include the administrative sector, criminal sector, the civil sector and the sub-district sector.

  • The “absolute competence” (absolute competentie) refers to the type of court which has jurisdiction to deal with the lawsuit. In first instance, as a rule, the district court has jurisdiction. The court of appeal has jurisdiction in appeal cases. The national supreme court has jurisdiction in cassation cases. As from 1 July 2011, the sub-district of the district court (sector kanton van de rechtbank) has jurisdiction with regard to claims with a maximum of € 25,000. Furthermore, the sub-district of the district court deals with all cases involving rents, hire purchase and employment. The civil sector of the district court (civiele sector van de rechtbank) handles cases not specifically allocated to the sub-district.
  • The “relative competence” (relatievecompetentie) refers to the regions in which the dispute must be brought to justice. The main rule is that the competent court is determined by the domicile of the defendant.

It happens that a dispute involves several countries. This is even more true when the internet comes into play. The first thing to do is to

identify the country in which the proceedings have to be introduced (in defence, the attorney-at-law should check also the means of challenging the jurisdiction of the court, if necessary). The issue is regulated by European legislation, but that legislation is complex.

17.4.2    Written pleadings in first instance

In principle, it is the plaintiff who initially produces a writ of summons (or petition). The defendant responds. The plaintiff may further respond (if the case is complex and permitted by the court) and so on.

The writ of summons (or petition) must contain the date upon which the case will be submitted to the court and a thorough description of the claim. It must also identify evidence, including prospective witnesses, to substantiate it. The summons must also contain a description of the defendant’s counter arguments if known. The reason for this is to concentrate litigation as much as possible. In The Netherlands, it is common to hand in the exhibits on the first scheduled date on the “role” (eersteroldatum). This is an administrative action at the courts and not a “real” oral hearing. If the defendant is outside the EU, there are deadlines to allow him to take knowledge of the existence of a trial and organize himself taking into account the distance.

Under the Netherlands professional rules for attorneys-at-law (advocaten) it is not allowed to issue a writ of summons without first summoning the other party separately. Only when a matter is of such importance that this earlier summoning cannot be waited for, this general rule does not apply.

Whenever pleadings (processtukken) are exchanged, they must be accompanied the exhibits (contracts, correspondence, statements etc.) referred to therein, unless these exhibits have been previously submitted. These exhibits are an important part of the evidence in civil proceedings (see also paragraph 0).

Deadlines are set early in the process and it is extremely difficult to change them later. This has the advantage of predictability, but the rigidity of the system is sometimes excessive.

In The Netherlands, the processing of the pleadings may be assigned to a judge who takes care of this matter only (rolrechter). This has the advantage of flexibility. If a problem arises, the judge may decide on it immediately.

In principle motions (incidenten) challenging the jurisdiction of the court, and to join an indispensable third party (impleader) must be filed before presenting the defence; a counter claim must be initiated together with the statement of defence, otherwise these rights are barred. Third parties who can demonstrate sufficient interest, may intervene before the last document is filed.

17.4.3    The oral hearing in first instance

After defense and counter claim, the court will set a date for oral hearings, unless the judge managing the case finds it necessary that both parties file a reply and rejoinder. This only happens when a matter is complicated.

During the oral hearing, at which parties have to appear in person with counsel, the judge either tries to encourage parties to settle the matter (which happens in approximately 50% of all the cases) or sets a date for final judgment or an interim judgment requiring further documentary

evidence or testimony by witnesses or experts. In more complex cases, f.i. patent cases, the judge may consent to oral pleadings before judgment. At the oral pleadings, the attorneys-at-law may submit their oral notes to the court  (and they will be part of the case files).

17.4.4    Judgment in first instance

After the hearing, the lawyers will receive the written judgment, often by post or electronic transmission. This may take a weeks or months (or even more than a year), depending on the number of cases to be treated, their complexity and the potential urgency.

In preliminary IP proceedings and IP proceedings on the merits a court may impose an injunction on the infringing party to refrain from any further infringements. The court may also order a recall of infringing products, publication of a rectification, supply of information regarding the infringement, such as the identity of customers or suppliers of infringing products and the details of such transactions. These court orders will be given under penalty of a fine. In proceedings on the merits the court may, in addition, order the infringing party to pay damages or surrender its profits made.

Once a judgment is rendered in a civil matter, its execution within the European Union is facilitated by the adoption of a number of Regulations that arrange recognition of decisions in the European Union.

17.4.5    Appeal at the court of appeal

Most of the time, an appeal can be made. The appeal proceedings are to be regarded as “new proceedings”. The proceedings follow the same principles as set out above. Despite rumours, it has never been demonstrated that having won or lost in the first proceedings has any impact on the chances of success at appeal.

17.4.6    Cassation at the national supreme court

The appeal in cassation is relatively rare. The Cassation court is not concerned with the facts and does not say who is right or wrong.  It will only verify that the procedure has been followed, and that the judge has applied the law correctly. It is therefore not a matter of re-hearing

the case, contrary to what occurs on appeal.

17.5    THE PRELIMINARY RULING (EUROPEAN COURT OF JUSTICE)

In disputes involving technology, IP and/or innovation, the rules are very often derived from a European directive or regulation.

When a judge in a national court has doubts as to the exact scope of a European directive or regulation or questions the compatibility of national legislation with the European statute from which it is derived, the judge has opportunity to ask a question to the Court of Justice of the European Union.

There is only one Court of Justice for the European Union, located in Luxembourg. It is the sole authority to interpret a directive or European regulation. In principle, all lawyers are admitted to plead before the Court. However, it is recommended to hire someone with some experience of this specific procedure.

In its considerations, the Court will not decide the dispute submitted to it. It will only inform the judge in the national court on the exact scope or meaning of the Directive or the European law in question, and tell the judge whether national law is compatible with the European statute. It will then be for the judge in the national court which has asked the question to settle the dispute, in strict interpretation of what has been laid down by the European Court.

17.6    LAWYERS FEES

At the end of the proceedings, the judge has the opportunity of imposing all (only in IP matters i.e. copyright, trademarks, patents and trade names) or part (in other matters) of the defence costs of the winning party on the unsuccessful party. In IP matters the court is relatively free to decide which costs are to be considered as realistic. The amount vary from case to case – simple and complicated. In other civil matters a base rate (liquidatietarief) is provided for in rules and the judge may only increase or decrease this to some extent to take into account the specificities of the case. The basic amount is determined according to the claim that is at stake.

17.7    DAMAGES

In substantive proceedings on the merits the court may award damages or order the defendant to surrender its profits (f.i. in case trade mark infringement).

For example, in IP matters these are only awarded if the defendant can be held responsible for the IP infringement and/or has acted in bad faith.

In preliminary proceedings, it is not possible to claim damages (generally speaking). It is only possible under certain circumstances to receive an advance payment for damages or surrender of profits.

Case law on the calculation of damages has not been very well developed in The Netherlands. If damages are awarded a party is entitled to compensation of actual damages, but determining these damages is in most cases not an « exact science ». In this regard, it is important that Dutch courts tend to take a conservative approach towards the calculation of damages. Awarding punitive damages or awarding double or triple damages is not possible under Dutch law. Alternatively, one can ask for the surrender of profits made by the infringement, but determining these profits can be a cumbersome exercise as well.

Against this background, most IP cases are about obtaining injunctive relief and not about damages.

17.8    EVIDENCE IN CIVIL PROCEEDINGS

17.8.1    Burden of proof

As a general rule, the burden of proof in proceedings on the merits is primarily on the plaintiff, i.e, the party that claims a particular position.

For example, it is up to the plaintiff to sufficiently clearly assert the scope of his trade mark right and how the defendant is infringing on that trade mark. To prove ownership of the trade mark – in principle – an extract of the trade mark register would be sufficient. If the defendant claims that the plaintiff is not the owner and/or the trade mark is invalid because of non-use, the defendant will have to prove this.

In case of copyright cases with a foreign author the plaintiff also has to provide evidence that the copyright also existed at the time of creation under the foreign law system.

However, Dutch law is relatively lenient in distributing the burden of proof between the parties in litigation. Principles of reasonableness and fairness will primarily determine which party has to produce certain evidence.

The same applies in preliminary proceedings except for the fact that parties do not have to submit indisputable evidence, but parties have to make their assertion sufficiently plausible.

17.8.2    Discovery of documents

Most evidence used in litigation in The Netherlands is in the form of written evidence. Generally, the concepts of « discovery » of documents (as in the United States of America) or « saisicontrefaçon » (as in France) are not available under Dutch law.

Under Dutch law a party with a legitimate interest can request the court to order the opposing party to submit certain documents concerning the legal relationship of the parties. The attorney-client privilege is not affected by this provision.

17.8.3    Language

In The Netherlands judges do not like pieces of evidence written in a foreign language. If there is correspondence or contracts to be produced in court, they must be translated into the language of the proceedings. Otherwise, one risks seeing the piece of evidence altogether excluded from the proceedings in court. On the other hand, most of the time, a simple translation should be sufficient (mostly, it is not necessary to use a sworn translator).

17.8.4    Witnesses

In practice witnesses only play a role in proceedings on the merits and not in preliminary proceedings. Witnesses will not be heard at the trial itself. Witnesses can be heard within the framework of ‘pre-trial’ depositions, which can be conducted prior to or during the proceedings. Witness depositions take place before a judge who has the lead in the questioning of the witness.

The judge drafts a statement that summarizes what the witness has declared. In most situations testimony is only taken after an interim judgment in proceedings on the merits. In that judgment the court indicates on which particular issues it needs further evidence. Witnesses usually do not play a role in infringement cases.

17.8.5    Experts

The parties can submit reports by party appointed experts. The parties can also ask the court to appoint independent experts, either within the framework of a pre-trial expert’s report or at a later stage after an interim judgment has been rendered. In such an interim judgment the court indicates on which issues it wants advice from experts. The parties will be heard on the appointment of experts.

17.9    CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS

Criminal proceedings (public law) operate under different rules. Without going into the details of these specific proceedings, we can report the following main thrusts:

On the level of evidence, the suspect has not much to do. Once the criminal authorities are notified of a complaint, they will organise the investigation and take the necessary measures. This has a significant advantage in terms of costs. On the other hand, this shows once again the loss of control of the suspect in relation to their complaint.

The investigation is conducted by authorities who are neutral in principle. They will instruct on uptake and completion. The prosecutor and the investigating judge (rechtercommissaris) do not judge, they investigate. Once the investigation is complete, they pass the case to another judge who will make a judgment after having heard the parties at a public hearing.

In general, the investigation is confidential. Depending on the circumstances, this confidentiality may even be opposed by the parties that are involved. Whether you are suspect, it is often difficult to know in which direction the investigation is moving. Moreover, regular leaks in the press are to be deplored. In sensitive cases, this means that one

must be always ready to respond in terms of communication.

When a case involves both a criminal investigation and civil or commercial proceedings, it is the criminal investigation which takes precedence (in principle). Civil proceedings will normally be suspended while the criminal investigation is ongoing.

As a result of the workload of the investigators and also the frequency of cases that involve several countries, it is not uncommon for criminal proceedings to last for several years. They may also be dismissed (geseponeerd).

18    UNITED KINGDOM

18.1    INTRODUCTION

This note provides a summary of the way in which IT and IP claims are handled in the English courts. Unlike most other European legal systems it is important to remember that:

  • there is no Civil Code in England;
  • English civil law consists of Parliamentary legislation and decisions of the courts;
  • English courts interpret legislation and are normally required to follow decisions by the same or higher courts.

18.2    THE COURT SYSTEM

Civil courts are divided between the High Court (dealing with larger and more complex cases in excess of £50,000) and County Courts. The High Court is divided into 3 divisions:

  • Queen’s Bench Division – dealing with mainly commercial and contractual claims which includes IT disputes being heard by the Technology & Construction Court (TCC);
  • Chancery Division – dealing with IP and company law disputes;
  • Family Division.

Appeals from all Divisions are heard by the Court of Appeal (normally 3 judges) and on particularly important legal issues a final appeal is possible to the Supreme Court (5 judges). Matters are also sometimes referred to the European Court of Justice for guidance when an interpretation of EU law is required.

18.3    KEY PROCEDURAL RULES & STAGES

18.3.1    Generally

Since 1998, the Civil Procedure Rules (CPR) govern all litigation in the English Courts, including IT and IP claims. The CPR aimed to harmonise and simplify English litigation procedure in order to:

  • ensure cases are handled justly;
  • speed up litigation;
  • reduce overall costs;
  • deal with cases proportionately given the amounts at stake.

18.3.2    Pre-Action

Parties are now required to act reasonably in exchanging information and documents in order to try to settle disputes before starting formal litigation; there are also special rules applying to particular types of disputes setting out the procedure parties are expected to follow (“pre-action protocols”). Failure to follow these rules or acting unreasonably risks the courts imposing sanctions on the offending party: costs sanctions are common which means that some of the other party’s legal costs will need to be paid or, the offending party will be denied some or all of its legal costs from the other party, even if it wins.

18.3.3    Proceedings in the High Court

The stages are as follows:

  • the claim – the Claimant issues a claim form setting out the key elements of the claim and facts relied upon (but not the evidence) and serves it on the defendant; a fee is payable depending on size of the claim;
  • the defence – the Defendant then has to indicate whether it accepts or contests the claim – if the latter, it will need to serve a defence (normally within 28 days); the defence is a vital document – if weak, the Claimant can try to have it “struck out”, ie ask the court to decide in favour of the Claimant on the basis that the defence has no legal prospect of success; failure to serve a defence in time will also allows the Claimant to enter a judgment in default; as the usual rule in English proceedings is that the loser pays the winner’s legal costs, where a Defendant is confident of defeating a claim and it appears that the Claimant may be unable to pay the Defendant’s costs, the Defendant can ask the court to order the Claimant to provide security for costs as a condition of continuing its action;
  • additional court documents may be served seeking to clarify each party’s position;
  • case management – the courts are increasingly active in managing cases to ensure that: issues are identified early, a trial timetable is agreed, unnecessary costs are not incurred by the parties and that the parties try to settle the dispute by alternative dispute resolution;
  • attempts to settle the dispute – whilst offers to settle the dispute can be made at any time, there is clearly an advantage to do so as early as possible to minimise overall costs; the CPR allows either party to make a written offer (“Part 36 Offer”) to settle and if the other party refuses it and recovers less from a trial, the refusing party will suffer adverse costs orders and/or higher interest payments; in addition, the court’s active case management includes encouraging settlement through mediation and, where parties unreasonably refuse to do so, have penalised this behaviour through costs orders in favour of the other side;
  • disclosure of documents – each party is required to disclose to the other side documents which: (i) it relies on; (ii) adversely affects its own case; and (iii) adversely affects or supports the other party’s case; disclosure applies to all documents (including confidential or electronic documents and other materials) and the only documents which do not need to be disclosed are those covered by legal professional privilege (normally this will be genuine settlement negotiations and legal advice relating to the litigation); disclosure is wider in scope than in most civil law countries and is often a key stage in the action as the strength of a claim is often much clearer after all relevant documents have been disclosed;
  • witness statements – in order for a party to give oral evidence at trial, it needs to disclose this in a witness statement; these statements will be exchanged by the parties several weeks before the trial date; at trial, all witnesses may be questioned on their statement by the other side’s lawyer to help the judge form a view of the evidence given;
  • expert evidence – this will often be required in IT and IP disputes and can be given with the Court’s permission; experts need to be independent and they have an overriding duty to the court rather than their instructing party; it is normal for each party’s experts to prepare a report and meet to discuss their reports to identify where they agree and disagree in advance of the trial; if a trial proceeds, experts are likely to give evidence and to be questioned by the other party’s lawyer and the judge: it is vital to select a true “expert” who is reasonable and honest in his approach as the English courts have been highly critical in the past of experts who have adopted a “hired gun” approach and not been independent;
  • trial – all IT and IP cases are heard by a single judge (no juries used); although legal arguments and evidence is submitted orally to the court, the judge will normally have read each party’s summary of its case, key documents, witness statements and expert reports before the trial begins; each party’s lawyer states its arguments to the judge and calls witnesses and experts relied upon and the trial ends with each lawyer summarising its case and the legal arguments it relies on; generally, the judge does not make his own investigation but may ask each party to clarify its position; the court’s judgment is normally given at a later date allowing the judge time to consider all the issues and arguments presented;
  • appeals – the appealing party must obtain the permission of the High Court or the Court of Appeal and permission is only granted in certain circumstances; appeals tend to be much shorter than the original trial given that witnesses and experts do not normally appear and the Court of Appeal will normally accept the facts as found by the trial judge; the appeal will focus on questions of law and whether the trial judge made a serious mistake on a legal issue or finding of fact;
  • costs – English courts have a wide discretion to award legal costs at the end of a trial: normally, the losing party will be ordered to pay the winner’s legal costs and this normally means that 60-70% of its actual costs will be paid;
  • enforcement – where a Defendant does not make payment as ordered by the court, the Claimant can use procedures such as seizing and selling assets belonging to the Defendant or take a charging order over the defendant’s property or commence insolvency proceedings on the basis of the unpaid judgment debt.

18.4    SPECIFIC ISSUES RELATING TO IT DISPUTES

Most IT claims relating to the design, supply and/or installation of computer/IT systems will be heard in the TCC, which is part of the Queen’s Bench Division. Features of the TCC include the following:

  • as the TCC judges have technical/scientific experience, TCC cases need to be technically complex or otherwise need a TCC judge;
  • the TCC is based in London and 11 other English cities – London normally only deals with claims valued at £250,000 or more;
  • active case management in relation to setting a trial date and timetable and identifying the key issues involved (trial dates are normally 12 months or so after the claim is served but depends on estimated length of the trial);
  • as well as promoting mediation and other forms of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR), it also offers Early Neutral Evaluation which is a non-binding, without prejudice written
  • evaluation of the dispute by a TCC judge at an early stage of proceedings; the judge giving the evaluation will not take any further part in the proceedings if they continue to trial and the evaluation is confidential to the parties.

Protecting Evidence. In many IT disputes, it is important to ensure that non-documentary materials are preserved as they will be highly relevant. For example, there may be claims that early versions of software were riddled with errors evidencing a breach by the developer – copies of these versions need to be preserved for possible inspection by experts. Accordingly, either written undertakings need to be given by the other side promising this or formal court orders obtained.

Preliminary Issues. Litigation relating to technology projects is often time-consuming and expensive due to the large number of documents that need to be checked and reviewed. In addition, many IT cases in practice turn on whether or not the supplier’s limitation of liability clause is enforceable or not which could drastically reduce the level of damages awarded. As a result, it may well make sense to have certain “preliminary issues” such as the validity of a limitation clause decided by the court before the trial as this often leads to a claim being withdrawn or a settlement being negotiated, saving overall time and costs. Similarly, the court will sometimes order a “split trial” where the initial trial only determines if the claim succeeds and a later trial concentrates on the damages payable (which can be a highly complex and expensive exercise).

Disclosure & The Smoking Gun. As all relevant documents relating to a claim need to be disclosed, care should be taken to ensure that the other side has disclosed everything that it should: for example, if there is a claim that the other side’s staff lacked key skills or performed badly, it will be useful to check any internal appraisals to see if any shortcomings were identified and there may also be internal reports created which shed light on the allegations made; equally, it is important to ensure that any new documents created relating to litigation are protected by litigation privilege so that they do not need to be disclosed at all.

18.5    SPECIFIC ISSUES RELATING TO IP DISPUTES

In the High Court, IP disputes are heard in the Patents Court of the Chancery Division, following the general procedures set out above. Although this allows IP cases to be analysed thoroughly by judges with IP experience, it can be expensive and for major patent disputes it is generally reckoned that each party’s costs will be in the region of £1m.

IP Enterprise Court (IPEC). In an attempt to reduce costs for small and medium sized IP claims that do not need to be heard by the High Court, IPEC has been introduced which replaces the old Patents County Court. It is designed to reduce costs and speed up the litigation procedure and its main features are:

  • a multi-track procedure in which damages awarded by the court are capped at £500,000;
  • the winning party cannot recover more than £50,000 costs from the losing party;
  • the procedure is managed very actively by the court to ensure that a larger, richer party cannot take an unfair advantage over the smaller party;
  • cross-examination is limited and trials cannot last for more than 2 days;
  • trials to be held within 12 months of the start of a claim.

It is reckoned that a party’s costs in relation to fighting a claim in the IPEC multi-track are £100,000 to £200,000.

Disclosure in IP Cases. The English rules can be very useful, particularly in multijurisdictional disputes. In Dansico v Novozymes, (a patent case concerning methods of making animal feed), Dansico were trying to revoke Novozymes’ patent in several EU countries on the grounds that it was obvious and not novel.

Dansico was successful in obtaining details of Novozymes’ experiments on making animal feed which showed that the patented method did not always improve the prior results obtained, which was a prerequisite for the granting of the patent. The English court gave permission for the evidence to be used in parallel proceedings at the European Patent Office with the result that the patent was also revoked in Germany, Denmark and The Netherlands.

[1] A detailed report on the references for a preliminary ruling from Austrian courts between 2009 and 2012 can be found under https://www.ris.bka.gv.at/Dokumente/Ebmj/ERL_07_000_20120109_001_15116EU_1_EU_12/07_20120109_15116EU1EU12_01.pdf (German only).

[2] Austrian Supreme Court on 13.02.2007, 4Ob246/06i.

[3] Austrian Supreme Court on 24. 2. 1998, 4 Ob 36/98t.

[4] Austrian Supreme Court on 19.12.2005, 4 Ob 194/05s.

[5] http://www.AustrianSupremeCourt.gv.at/files/documents/taetigkeitsberichte/taetigkeitsbericht2012.pdf (in German only).

[6] Austrian Supreme Court on 22.2.2007, 3 Ob 253/06m.

[7] Austrian Supreme Court on 9.8.2006, 4 Ob 138/06g.

[8] Unjustified warning letters may be lead to (counter) actions based on the Austrian Unfair Competition Act  and to cost reimbursement claims based on Austrian tort law.

[9] Official Gazette of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Nos. 53/2003, 73/2005, 19/2006 and 98/2015.

[10] Official Gazette of the Republic of Srpska, Nos. 58/2003, 85/2003, 74/2005, 63/2007 and 105/2008.

[11] Official Gazette of Brcko District, Nos. 5/2000, 1/2001, 6/2002, 11/2005 and 20/2006.

[12] Official Gazzete of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Nos. 3/03, 32/03, 36/03, 26/04, 63/04, 13/05, 48/05, 46/06, 76/06, 29/07, 32/07, 53/07, 76/07, 15/08, 58/08, 12/09, 16/09, 93/09 and 72/13.

[13] Official Gazette of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Nos. 35/03, 37/03, 56/03, 78/04, 28/05, 55/06, 27/07, 53/07, 09/09, 12/10, 08/13 and 59/14.

[14] Official Gazette of the Republic of Srpska, No. 53/12.

[15] Official Gazette of Brcko District, Nos. 48/04, 6/05, 14/07, 19/07, 21/07, 2/08, 17/09, 9/13 and 27/14.

[16] Hungary adopted a new Code on Civil Procedure (Act CXXX of 2016), which will enter into force on 1st January 2018. In this chapter we detail the provisions of the current code in force.

[17] Official Gazette of Republic of Serbia, Nos. 72/2011, 49/2013, 74/2013 and 55/2014.

[18] Official Gazette of Republic of Serbia, Nos. 72/2011, 101/2011, 121/2012, 32/2013, 45/2013 and 55/2014.

[19] Official Gazette of Republic of Serbia, Nos. 116/2008, 104/2009, 101/2010, 31/2011, 78/2011 101/2011, 101/2013, 106/2015, 40/2015, 13/2016 and 108/2016.

[20] Official Gazette of Republic of Serbia, No. 101/2013.

[21] Law no. 6100, published in the Official Gazette of Turkey No. 27836,  came into force on October 1, 2011

[22] Law no. 5271, published in the Official Gazette of Turkey No. 25673, came into force on June 1, 2005

[23] Law no. 2577, published in the Official Gazette of Turkey No. 17580, came into force on January 20, 1982

[24] There are some actions that are not appealable  i.e. should the matter of dispute is below 25000 Turkish Liras, should the case is before the Civil Court of Peace, as mentioned on article 362 of “HMK”

[25] It shall be noted that, after the establishment of “court of appeals” these period shall apply for applications to court of appeals whereas appealing before the Supreme Court period shall be one month instead.

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